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How’s this for bad PR? A Tesla Model S car burst into flames in Washington State this week after a relatively minor accident on a highway.
Tesla has reacted to the accident, noting that the car had a “direct impact” with a “large metallic object,” which hit “one of the 16 modules within the Model S battery pack.” 

How’s this for bad PR? A Tesla Model S car burst into flames in Washington State this week after a relatively minor accident on a highway.

Tesla has reacted to the accident, noting that the car had a “direct impact” with a “large metallic object,” which hit “one of the 16 modules within the Model S battery pack.” 

Daily Fast Feed Roundup

Happy Hump Day! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 

  • TripAdvisor just bought GateGuru, an app that offers travelers airport info in real-time. 

Have a great day! —M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Tesla, a Silicon Valley electric vehicle startup that first came to prominence with the all-electric Roadster sportscar, isn’t yet known as a mainstream car manufacturer—unsurprising since it’s first product had a base price of $109,000. The Model S, a five-seat sedan released today, is Tesla’s debut into the mainstream market. If it succeeds, it could bolster the entire EV industry. If it fails, Tesla will be in trouble.

This week, I had the chance to test-drive the Model S at Tesla’s factory in Fremont, Calif.. I can’t predict how well the car will do (though there are 10,000 reservations), but I can say this: it’s one of the most fun vehicles I’ve ever driven—and certainly the most exciting sedan. The car’s mammoth 17-inch central console touchscreen, which controls the sunroof, regenerative braking strength, music, maps, and more, doesn’t hurt. I experienced the Model S as both a passenger and driver.

Inside The Tesla Model S