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The host of CNN’s Parts Unknown (starting again on Sunday) wants to make a great show—and challenge some cultural assumptions.

The point is to resist the predictable, especially when it comes to TV’s ingrained conventions. “The only thing that makes me upset and, really, a dick is if something is fucking plodding and reasonable,” he says, spitting out that last word with palpable revulsion. “It starts with an establishing shot, I go someplace, I meet somebody, I sit down, I eat, and I come to a conclusion: That kind of conventional thinking really upsets me. I would much rather see some incomprehensible, over-the-top, fucked-up thing, because at least you’re trying to do something awesome.”

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The host of CNN’s Parts Unknown (starting again on Sunday) wants to make a great show—and challenge some cultural assumptions.

The point is to resist the predictable, especially when it comes to TV’s ingrained conventions. “The only thing that makes me upset and, really, a dick is if something is fucking plodding and reasonable,” he says, spitting out that last word with palpable revulsion. “It starts with an establishing shot, I go someplace, I meet somebody, I sit down, I eat, and I come to a conclusion: That kind of conventional thinking really upsets me. I would much rather see some incomprehensible, over-the-top, fucked-up thing, because at least you’re trying to do something awesome.”

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Going into its 45th season, Sesame Street gives us a glimpse of its future. Plus, clips from our favorite historic episodes.
If you are under the age of 50, there’s a good chance you are fiercely attached to Sesame Street, the show that shepherded so many of us through our toddler years.
You may remember sitting in rapt attention, wondering if anybody would believe that Mr. Snuffleupagus was real, or giggling hysterically about Oscar the Grouch’s musical ode to trash. For generations of viewers, Sesame Street is a portal to a simpler, more innocent time in their lives. This creates something of a quandary for the show’s producers: how do you keep evolving a show so it doesn’t get stale without offending its devoted fans?
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Going into its 45th season, Sesame Street gives us a glimpse of its future. Plus, clips from our favorite historic episodes.

If you are under the age of 50, there’s a good chance you are fiercely attached to Sesame Street, the show that shepherded so many of us through our toddler years.

You may remember sitting in rapt attention, wondering if anybody would believe that Mr. Snuffleupagus was real, or giggling hysterically about Oscar the Grouch’s musical ode to trash. For generations of viewers, Sesame Street is a portal to a simpler, more innocent time in their lives. This creates something of a quandary for the show’s producers: how do you keep evolving a show so it doesn’t get stale without offending its devoted fans?

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Featuring kenyatta​ and slavin​, "The Audience Has an Audience" explores how TV show fans take to Tumblr and other social media to share their passion with fan communities. (Video length: 6 minutes, 24 seconds)

Storytelling, fandom, and social media— especially Tumblr. doctorwho definitely gets it, and more brands should pay attention to the way their stories are already being told by their fans and followers in social spaces. 

Summer 2014 is officially dead. Nobody seems upset about that, because it was a weird one. For the first time in all of human history, there was no official Song of the Summer (stop trying to make “Fancy” happen). A movie featuring a talking raccoon made over half a billion dollars, and you loved it. Famous people poured ice buckets on stuff. As the empty calories of summer entertainment recede into the rearview, however, we welcome a far more nourishing batch of creativity. Fall is a time for Oscar bait, the return of TV, and an unwieldy number of must-listen albums dropping on the same Tuesday. In order to help cut through the clutter, Co.Create has prepared a guide to the most promising movies, shows, albums, tours, and other fun stuff coming your way in September. If you somehow manage to get bored with all these options available, well, you should be ashamed of yourself.
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Summer 2014 is officially dead. Nobody seems upset about that, because it was a weird one. For the first time in all of human history, there was no official Song of the Summer (stop trying to make “Fancy” happen). A movie featuring a talking raccoon made over half a billion dollars, and you loved it. Famous people poured ice buckets on stuff. As the empty calories of summer entertainment recede into the rearview, however, we welcome a far more nourishing batch of creativity. Fall is a time for Oscar bait, the return of TV, and an unwieldy number of must-listen albums dropping on the same Tuesday. In order to help cut through the clutter, Co.Create has prepared a guide to the most promising movies, shows, albums, tours, and other fun stuff coming your way in September. If you somehow manage to get bored with all these options available, well, you should be ashamed of yourself.

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Matt Mira reveals the steps on his path from Apple Store to inspiring The Nerdist podcast and writing for Comedy Central hit @midnight.

People move to Los Angeles every day to embark upon careers in the promised land of show business. Most of them end up dwelling in entertainment purgatory. Nobody knows exactly which factors set people on the path from nowhere to somewhere, but talent is only part of the equation. The rest of it seems to involve some dark-arts combination of making connections and working your ass off. For Matt Mira, both happened once he became a Genius.
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Matt Mira reveals the steps on his path from Apple Store to inspiring The Nerdist podcast and writing for Comedy Central hit @midnight.

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People move to Los Angeles every day to embark upon careers in the promised land of show business. Most of them end up dwelling in entertainment purgatory. Nobody knows exactly which factors set people on the path from nowhere to somewhere, but talent is only part of the equation. The rest of it seems to involve some dark-arts combination of making connections and working your ass off. For Matt Mira, both happened once he became a Genius.

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Rebecca Eaton, longtime executive producer of Masterpiece, reveals the creative risks she took to reinvent a failing series.
"We did a couple of drastic things. We changed the name. And we organized the programming, different genres, started doing more social media. We didn’t change the programs, we just changed the on-air look of them and the marketing of them. And it worked."
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Rebecca Eaton, longtime executive producer of Masterpiece, reveals the creative risks she took to reinvent a failing series.

"We did a couple of drastic things. We changed the name. And we organized the programming, different genres, started doing more social media. We didn’t change the programs, we just changed the on-air look of them and the marketing of them. And it worked."

Read More>