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A study from AVAST published Wednesday found one in five men and one in four women admit to checking their partners’ smartphones without their consent. Surveying 13,132 respondents in the U.S., AVAST said a quarter of married women who did check their spouses’ phones did so out of suspicions of infidelity. However, most women did so “because they are nosey,” the company said.

Your Significant Other Is Probably Snooping On Your Smartphone
Fast Company staff writer Chris Gayomali and technology editor Harry McCracken will live blog Samsung’s latest launch today in New York at 9 a.m. ET. The company is expected to announce the Galaxy Note 4 smartphone and other products.
Samsung organizes its media events into seasons and episodes, as if they were TV shows. Today it will hold Samsung Unpacked 2014 Episode 2, which is taking place in three places at once: Berlin (where the IFA consumer electronics show will be going on), Beijing, and New York.
Fast Company's Chris Gayomali and Harry McCracken will be reporting from that last version, and will share the news here as it happens. It’s a given that it will include the announcement of the Galaxy Note 4—Samsung’s invitations coyly asked attendees to “note the date”—but rumor has it that the company might unveil a virtual reality system as well.
 
Our coverage begins at 9 a.m. ET/6 a.m. PT.

Join us here>

Fast Company staff writer Chris Gayomali and technology editor Harry McCracken will live blog Samsung’s latest launch today in New York at 9 a.m. ET. The company is expected to announce the Galaxy Note 4 smartphone and other products.

Samsung organizes its media events into seasons and episodes, as if they were TV shows. Today it will hold Samsung Unpacked 2014 Episode 2, which is taking place in three places at once: Berlin (where the IFA consumer electronics show will be going on), Beijing, and New York.

Fast Company's Chris Gayomali and Harry McCracken will be reporting from that last version, and will share the news here as it happens. It’s a given that it will include the announcement of the Galaxy Note 4—Samsung’s invitations coyly asked attendees to “note the date”—but rumor has it that the company might unveil a virtual reality system as well.
 
Our coverage begins at 9 a.m. ET/6 a.m. PT.
Earlier this week we covered a bicycle that can’t be stolen because the lock is part of the frame. But what if you want to hack the bike you already have?
In the spirit of technology upgraders everywhere, we’ve whipped up a list of ways to enhance your ride with products and concepts that are available now or currently raising money via crowdfunding.
Read More>

Earlier this week we covered a bicycle that can’t be stolen because the lock is part of the frame. But what if you want to hack the bike you already have?

In the spirit of technology upgraders everywhere, we’ve whipped up a list of ways to enhance your ride with products and concepts that are available now or currently raising money via crowdfunding.

Read More>

In 2012 the Pebble smartwatch became the most backed product in Kickstarter history, gaining $10.3 million during its fundraising period.
That record stood until yesterday, when another product smashed Pebble’s pledges—earning an astonishing $11,045,769 (and counting) for a Kickstarter project that still has around 24 hours on the clock.
The project? The Coolest Cooler: a $299 USB-enabled, Buetooth speaker-pumping, illuminated, partitioned, accessory-holding cooler featuring an onboard blender. It is, to put it simply, the most incredible story in crowdfunding history—and made all the more amazing by the fact that Portland-based creator Ryan Grepper only set out to raise $50,000.
So how did a glorified drinks holder become a Kickstarter record breaker?
Read More>

In 2012 the Pebble smartwatch became the most backed product in Kickstarter history, gaining $10.3 million during its fundraising period.

That record stood until yesterday, when another product smashed Pebble’s pledges—earning an astonishing $11,045,769 (and counting) for a Kickstarter project that still has around 24 hours on the clock.

The project? The Coolest Cooler: a $299 USB-enabled, Buetooth speaker-pumping, illuminated, partitioned, accessory-holding cooler featuring an onboard blender. It is, to put it simply, the most incredible story in crowdfunding history—and made all the more amazing by the fact that Portland-based creator Ryan Grepper only set out to raise $50,000.

So how did a glorified drinks holder become a Kickstarter record breaker?

Read More>

Box SVP Sam Schillace shares how he quickly and cheaply experimented on an app no one wanted—that became the basis for Google Docs.

Schillace says that even at companies focused on innovation, it’s hard to convince others of the value of truly new things. “Whenever you see something that’s truly creative or disruptive, it challenges your worldview. And when you’re challenged like that, you have a choice either to accept the challenge, meaning that you are in some way wrong, or reject it, which is saying that the thing itself is wrong. So it’s very rare that people will say, ‘Oh I must be stupid because I didn’t see this,’ so usually people’s first reaction is to reject them.”

Read More>

Box SVP Sam Schillace shares how he quickly and cheaply experimented on an app no one wanted—that became the basis for Google Docs.

Schillace says that even at companies focused on innovation, it’s hard to convince others of the value of truly new things. “Whenever you see something that’s truly creative or disruptive, it challenges your worldview. And when you’re challenged like that, you have a choice either to accept the challenge, meaning that you are in some way wrong, or reject it, which is saying that the thing itself is wrong. So it’s very rare that people will say, ‘Oh I must be stupid because I didn’t see this,’ so usually people’s first reaction is to reject them.”

Read More>

Tweaking the UX of our social media tools could help readers better understand fast-moving news.
The Boston Marathon bombings. Tornadoes in the Midwest. Now, tragically, Ferguson. When serious breaking news happens, many of us turn to social media—especially Twitter—to keep up and get the most detailed information we can as quickly as possible. But the events in Missouri these last few weeks made me think about the deficiencies of our current information tools, and how we might improve the social, breaking news experience.
Read More>

Tweaking the UX of our social media tools could help readers better understand fast-moving news.

The Boston Marathon bombings. Tornadoes in the Midwest. Now, tragically, Ferguson. When serious breaking news happens, many of us turn to social media—especially Twitter—to keep up and get the most detailed information we can as quickly as possible. But the events in Missouri these last few weeks made me think about the deficiencies of our current information tools, and how we might improve the social, breaking news experience.

Read More>