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They aren’t waiting around or keeping their heads down, no matter what anyone says.
Young, hopeful entrepreneurs are never at a loss for free advice from those who have “been there, done that.”
The best companies have millennials and women in charge, so it’s no surprise there are countless well-meaning people ready to dole out their two cents.
But how do you separate the distractions from truly valuable advice? These five women in the tech and business industries made their own ways, but sifted through their share of unsolicited chaff in the process.
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They aren’t waiting around or keeping their heads down, no matter what anyone says.

Young, hopeful entrepreneurs are never at a loss for free advice from those who have “been there, done that.”

The best companies have millennials and women in charge, so it’s no surprise there are countless well-meaning people ready to dole out their two cents.

But how do you separate the distractions from truly valuable advice? These five women in the tech and business industries made their own ways, but sifted through their share of unsolicited chaff in the process.

Read More>

All-emoji chat apps are here to test your powers of nonverbal expression.
If someone adds a happy face to the end of a text message, you know what it connotes. But what about messages without any text, only little yellow faces? Can people really communicate exclusively in emoji?
We’ll find out soon. Both Emojli and Emojicate are emoji-only chat apps that are trying to turn the little smiley faces into a dedicated language.
Read More>

All-emoji chat apps are here to test your powers of nonverbal expression.

If someone adds a happy face to the end of a text message, you know what it connotes. But what about messages without any text, only little yellow faces? Can people really communicate exclusively in emoji?

We’ll find out soon. Both Emojli and Emojicate are emoji-only chat apps that are trying to turn the little smiley faces into a dedicated language.

Read More>

International artists that tinker heavily with computers to create their work are called “glitch artists.” They produce a type of new media art that lays out defects—glitches—in a given computer system onto a visual canvas, whether it’s print, 3-D installation, or computer screen.
A new exhibit at the Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art in Chicago is celebrating their work, but why? Historically, humans have been indifferent to non-human art; none of Koko the Gorilla’s drawings appear in the Louvre. So will art fans flock to glitch art? Or are these digital artifacts only a mother(board) could love?
Read More>

International artists that tinker heavily with computers to create their work are called “glitch artists.” They produce a type of new media art that lays out defects—glitches—in a given computer system onto a visual canvas, whether it’s print, 3-D installation, or computer screen.

A new exhibit at the Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art in Chicago is celebrating their work, but why? Historically, humans have been indifferent to non-human art; none of Koko the Gorilla’s drawings appear in the Louvre. So will art fans flock to glitch art? Or are these digital artifacts only a mother(board) could love?

Read More>

Square, the payments startup from Twitter cofounder Jack Dorsey, has prototyped a Square credit card. The plastic card is all black, and save for the card holder’s name emblazoned on the face, features no logos—not even Square’s. Over the past year, multiple sources indicate Square employees have been carrying the card—seen here below, partially blurred to protect the card holder’s identity—around in their wallets.

However, despite buzz about the potential of a Square credit card, other company sources indicate the project was recently killed.
Details of the rumored prototype came to light during reporting for Fast Company's profile of Square, published this week. As Square seeks to unearth new sources of revenue beyond its core business of payments processing, the company has launched a slew of new products, including Square Market, Cash, Feedback, Invoices, Capital, Dashboard, and on Monday, August 11, Appointments. Some insiders expected the Square credit card would be a promising addition to the mix, potentially opening the company up to a swath of lucrative consumer loyalty and rewards services. But after pressing the company multiple times about the project, Square finally confirmed that it’s not launching a credit card. Or, should we say, the company is no longer launching one. And the reason why highlights the difficulties Square faces in the immensely complex financial space.
Read More>

Square, the payments startup from Twitter cofounder Jack Dorsey, has prototyped a Square credit card. The plastic card is all black, and save for the card holder’s name emblazoned on the face, features no logos—not even Square’s. Over the past year, multiple sources indicate Square employees have been carrying the card—seen here below, partially blurred to protect the card holder’s identity—around in their wallets.

image

However, despite buzz about the potential of a Square credit card, other company sources indicate the project was recently killed.

Details of the rumored prototype came to light during reporting for Fast Company's profile of Square, published this week. As Square seeks to unearth new sources of revenue beyond its core business of payments processing, the company has launched a slew of new products, including Square Market, Cash, Feedback, Invoices, Capital, Dashboard, and on Monday, August 11, Appointments. Some insiders expected the Square credit card would be a promising addition to the mix, potentially opening the company up to a swath of lucrative consumer loyalty and rewards services. But after pressing the company multiple times about the project, Square finally confirmed that it’s not launching a credit card. Or, should we say, the company is no longer launching one. And the reason why highlights the difficulties Square faces in the immensely complex financial space.

Read More>

Long a holdout, Apple has joined Google, Facebook, Twitter, and other tech companies by releasing a diversity report of its own. And like the rest of them, the makeup at the Cupertino, California company is largely white and male.
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Long a holdout, Apple has joined Google, Facebook, Twitter, and other tech companies by releasing a diversity report of its own. And like the rest of them, the makeup at the Cupertino, California company is largely white and male.

Read More>