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If existing fitness bands are designed like overzealous kindergarten teachers, then the Pavlok is a drill sergeant. The band—$150 on preorder today—will quite literally shock you to wake up on time or exercise when you should.
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If existing fitness bands are designed like overzealous kindergarten teachers, then the Pavlok is a drill sergeant. The band—$150 on preorder today—will quite literally shock you to wake up on time or exercise when you should.

Read More>

TerraMax kits turn ordinary military trucks into self-driving road warriors.
When you think of self-driving vehicles, you probably think of Google, Audi, and Daimler. Although the research underlying all of their advances was funded by DARPA, it’s somewhat surprising that the military isn’t already way ahead of everyone else when it comes to remote-controlled ground movement.
Oshkosh Defense is hoping to change that. 
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TerraMax kits turn ordinary military trucks into self-driving road warriors.

When you think of self-driving vehicles, you probably think of Google, Audi, and Daimler. Although the research underlying all of their advances was funded by DARPA, it’s somewhat surprising that the military isn’t already way ahead of everyone else when it comes to remote-controlled ground movement.

Oshkosh Defense is hoping to change that. 

Read More>


In Praise Of Disciplined Creativity

As ‎executive director of Global Brand Marketing at General Electric (generalelectric)Linda Boff has the muscle of one of the world’s biggest technology innovators at her disposal. To cram the work of engineers and makers creating new things every day into the blip-sized limits of Twitter or Instagram is a true skill. 

Watch the video above to hear how working within these sort of creative constraints help focus GE pitch meetings.

For 82 years, Disney’s in-studio life drawing classes have helped evolve its animated characters. But as increasing reliance on computers lures young animators away from classical drawing, three of Disney’s current master teachers are reminding them why figure drawing is still crucial.
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For 82 years, Disney’s in-studio life drawing classes have helped evolve its animated characters. But as increasing reliance on computers lures young animators away from classical drawing, three of Disney’s current master teachers are reminding them why figure drawing is still crucial.

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Last year we reported on the first machines going into The UPS Stores. How’s it going?
Almost a year ago, The UPS Store in San Diego was the first to launch retail 3-D printing, available to anyone. The experiment was targeted at small businesses and startups giving them access to a 3-D designer and printer in part to assist in building their products. But how did it work out?
The good news is that putting a 3-D printer in a retail store, right next to the regular one-dimensional copy machines, actually works. As such, the company will be announcing expansion plans in the fall to put more 3-D printers in stores across the country. Its expectation that the technology wasn’t just a fad is proving true, but it’s also learned a few lessons over the last year.
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Last year we reported on the first machines going into The UPS Stores. How’s it going?

Almost a year ago, The UPS Store in San Diego was the first to launch retail 3-D printing, available to anyone. The experiment was targeted at small businesses and startups giving them access to a 3-D designer and printer in part to assist in building their products. But how did it work out?

The good news is that putting a 3-D printer in a retail store, right next to the regular one-dimensional copy machines, actually works. As such, the company will be announcing expansion plans in the fall to put more 3-D printers in stores across the country. Its expectation that the technology wasn’t just a fad is proving true, but it’s also learned a few lessons over the last year.

Read More>

Missing The World Cup? There’s Still The RoboCup, The World Cup for Robots

It’s been nearly a month since Uruguayan striker Luis Suarez bit Italy’s Giorgio Chiellini on the shoulder in a stadium in Brazil (or, in Suarez’s words “suffered the physical result of a bite in the collusion he suffered with me”). But this week, just a little more than a hundred miles south of where that game took place, one Iranian soccer-playing robot in the RoboCup—the World Cup for robots—malfunctioned, falling on top of one of its Indonesian opponents and ripping off its arm.

Fouls work a little differently at the RoboCup, which for the past 17 years has invited teams of roboticists from all over the globe to pit their soccer-playing machines against one another. This year, the competition is taking place in a Brazilian conference center with a manmade pond and a building shaped like a space-age beard trimmer, where 2,200 human participants (and thousands more spectators) will finish competing for RoboCup titles today.

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New predictive analytics are making Moneyball look obsolete.
At a workshop during the GigaOm Structure conference, Hensberger shared his next-level data crunching and the academic paper his team prepared for the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference. His team modeled MLB data to show with 74.5% accuracy what a pitcher is going to throw—and when.
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New predictive analytics are making Moneyball look obsolete.

At a workshop during the GigaOm Structure conference, Hensberger shared his next-level data crunching and the academic paper his team prepared for the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference. His team modeled MLB data to show with 74.5% accuracy what a pitcher is going to throw—and when.

Read More>