FastCompany Magazine

The official Tumblr of Fast Company.


One year from today, on October 21, 2015, Marty McFly and company are scheduled to arrive from the past—as seen in Back to the Future Part II. And what a disappointment it would be if our future world didn’t have hoverboards for Marty to zip around on. But fear not: Hoverboards really are on the way!
Read More>

image

One year from today, on October 21, 2015Marty McFly and company are scheduled to arrive from the past—as seen in Back to the Future Part II. And what a disappointment it would be if our future world didn’t have hoverboards for Marty to zip around on. But fear not: Hoverboards really are on the way!

Read More>

In the 1960s women made up about 50 of all computer programmers, so what happened?
Since her 20-year-old daughter told her she was dropping her computer science major in college, Robin Hauser Reynolds has made it her mission to understand why the coding industry can be so unwelcoming to women.
Why is it that while 37% of U.S. college computer science grads in 1985 were women, today only 17% are?
Reynolds has talked to women coders, historians, neuroscientists, psychologists, and people working inside some of the biggest tech companies in Silicon Valley, looking for answers. The result is a documentary film, CODE, that recently raised more than $86,000 through an Indiegogo campaign.
Reynolds and the films coproducer, Staci Hartman, who also has a daughter in her 20s working in the tech industry, were driven by more than just personal connections. As they started investigating, the data they came across suggested this was more than just a women’s issue.
The figure to convince them: the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ projection that by 2020, there will be 1.4 million computer science jobs and only 400,000 computer scientists to fill them. “That’s a million unfilled jobs,” says Reynolds.
Why aren’t women getting more involved in an industry where the need and growth potential is so great?
Read More>

In the 1960s women made up about 50 of all computer programmers, so what happened?

Since her 20-year-old daughter told her she was dropping her computer science major in college, Robin Hauser Reynolds has made it her mission to understand why the coding industry can be so unwelcoming to women.

Why is it that while 37% of U.S. college computer science grads in 1985 were women, today only 17% are?

Reynolds has talked to women coders, historians, neuroscientists, psychologists, and people working inside some of the biggest tech companies in Silicon Valley, looking for answers. The result is a documentary film, CODE, that recently raised more than $86,000 through an Indiegogo campaign.

Reynolds and the films coproducer, Staci Hartman, who also has a daughter in her 20s working in the tech industry, were driven by more than just personal connections. As they started investigating, the data they came across suggested this was more than just a women’s issue.

The figure to convince them: the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ projection that by 2020, there will be 1.4 million computer science jobs and only 400,000 computer scientists to fill them. “That’s a million unfilled jobs,” says Reynolds.

Why aren’t women getting more involved in an industry where the need and growth potential is so great?

Read More>

image

What happens when brands adopt a technology before most people have a chance to play with it? That’s what’s happening now with Oculus Rift, which has become the new plaything of brands eager to show off their cool factor—but it means that, for most people, their first experience with the virtual reality goggles will be as a thing that shows them advertising.

Is that a bad thing? Fast Company senior editor Jason Feifer argues yes, and he has a message for brands: back off! Watch the video to see why.

Do you agree, or are you excited when brands jump in on new experiences? Either way, tell us by tweeting with the hashtag #brandsbrandsbrands.

Apple Introduces “5K” Retina iMac With 14.7 Million Pixels
The iMac didn’t really get its due at Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference this summer. With all the fanfare focused on software, Apple rolled out incremental changes and price cuts for its iMac line. On Thursday, the company pulled the focus back to its desktop computers, showing off new iMacs with high-resolution “5K” displays and updating the oft-overlooked Mac Mini with faster processor and graphics.
Read More>

Apple Introduces “5K” Retina iMac With 14.7 Million Pixels

The iMac didn’t really get its due at Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference this summer. With all the fanfare focused on software, Apple rolled out incremental changes and price cuts for its iMac line. On Thursday, the company pulled the focus back to its desktop computers, showing off new iMacs with high-resolution “5K” displays and updating the oft-overlooked Mac Mini with faster processor and graphics.

Read More>

image

When the first astronauts landed on the moon, they used rakes to dig up rocks for research. Since then scientists have had to find ways to get planetary dirt samples without manpower. The engineers at Honeybee Robotics believe they’ve found a way—and it’s simpler than you’d think. Watch the video above to see how it works

image

Steves Jobs and Wozniak lived the original Silicon Valley creation myth when they built the first Apple computer—basically a funky circuit board encased in wood—at Jobs’s parent’s house in Cupertino in 1976. In this week’s Brand Evolution, see how they went from geeky garage dwellers to creating the most successful tech company in the world.

In the report, the cyber security company predicted that the first death-by-Internet-of-Things would occur by the end of 2014. It cited former vice president Dick Cheney turning off his pacemaker for fear of remote tampering, conspiracies surrounding the sudden death of journalist Michael Hastings, and an FDA warning about Internet-connected medical devices as reason for their fears.

An “Internet Murder” Could Happen By The End of This Year