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How To Make A Working Cell Phone Out Of Cardboard

There’s no device more simultaneously intimate and mysterious than the cell phone. It’s in your front pocket, carrying private texts and emails—and yet it’s also a voluntary tracking device and a technological black box. “There’s little DIY culture around them, at least in the west,” notes David Mellis, MIT professor and co-creator of Arduino, a popular DIY hardware platform.

But Mellis wants to change that.

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When the auction and marketplace that once led the online shopping charge started to fall behind, eBay started looking for the next big thing: recording what you look at, touch, and take into a dressing room.
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When the auction and marketplace that once led the online shopping charge started to fall behind, eBay started looking for the next big thing: recording what you look at, touch, and take into a dressing room.

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In a bid sure to lure binge watchers of quality programs like The Sopranos and The Wire, a new deal will bring HBO series to Amazon Prime streaming and Fire TV.
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In a bid sure to lure binge watchers of quality programs like The Sopranos and The Wire, a new deal will bring HBO series to Amazon Prime streaming and Fire TV.

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parislemon:

Yes, that’s Tim Cook narrating. As Rene Ritchie notes:

My best guess as to why Tim Cook narrated the “Better” video is because it speaks to Apple’s core values, and speaking to Apple’s core values is both deeply important to Tim Cook, and how he’s been positioned atop and within Apple.

You can say Tim Cook is not a product guy, but there’s no question that he knows better than anyone how Apple does what it does. And because he cares about it, he’s made that process… better.

Robonaut, installed on the International Space Station to perform chores for astronauts, just got its first pair of real legs.

NASA says that the new seven-jointed legs are designed for climbing in zero gravity and offer a considerable nine-foot leg span. Instead of feet, the legs feature “end effectors” designed to grapple onto handrails and sockets located both inside the space station and, eventually, on the ISS’s exterior. Robonaut’s end effectors have a built-in vision system—almost like a pair of eyes—that are designed to eventually automate each limb’s approaching and grasping.

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Robonaut, installed on the International Space Station to perform chores for astronauts, just got its first pair of real legs.

NASA says that the new seven-jointed legs are designed for climbing in zero gravity and offer a considerable nine-foot leg span. Instead of feet, the legs feature “end effectors” designed to grapple onto handrails and sockets located both inside the space station and, eventually, on the ISS’s exterior. Robonaut’s end effectors have a built-in vision system—almost like a pair of eyes—that are designed to eventually automate each limb’s approaching and grasping.

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With advances in biotechnology promising a future of lab-grown homes, hamburgers, and even the very shirts on our backs, a better question might be: What won’t be grown from cells in the future?
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With advances in biotechnology promising a future of lab-grown homes, hamburgers, and even the very shirts on our backs, a better question might be: What won’t be grown from cells in the future?

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Nike is reportedly laying off its Fuelband team to focus on fitness software, instead.

Nike will reportedly refocus its efforts on developing fitness software—Nike+, Nike+ Running, etc. And we’ve heard murmurs that Nike may be looking for a potential partner on the hardware side…
Can you say “iWatch”?

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Nike is reportedly laying off its Fuelband team to focus on fitness software, instead.

Nike will reportedly refocus its efforts on developing fitness software—Nike+, Nike+ Running, etc. And we’ve heard murmurs that Nike may be looking for a potential partner on the hardware side…

Can you say “iWatch”?

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We talked to the folks behind some of Silicon Valley’s most well-known parties about the importance of play.

Tech parties often get a bad rap. At one recent event, the organizers paid for a 600-pound tiger in a cage and a monkey trained to pose for Instagram photos. Another party for a prominent Googler featured mounds of manmade snow in 70-degree weather. But not all corporate parties are the epitome of Silicon Valley excess.
In fact, historically the best Valley parties have left a huge mark on the industry

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We talked to the folks behind some of Silicon Valley’s most well-known parties about the importance of play.

Tech parties often get a bad rap. At one recent event, the organizers paid for a 600-pound tiger in a cage and a monkey trained to pose for Instagram photos. Another party for a prominent Googler featured mounds of manmade snow in 70-degree weather. But not all corporate parties are the epitome of Silicon Valley excess.

In fact, historically the best Valley parties have left a huge mark on the industry

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Knocking down a concrete building usually takes brute force: Wrecking balls, huge excavators, or explosives rip apart walls while fire hoses spray water to keep the clouds of dust down. It’s an energy-intensive process, and after everything’s been torn apart, the concrete often ends up in a landfill or has to be trucked to a recycling facility. But a new concrete-erasing robot may eventually transform the messy business of demolition.
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Knocking down a concrete building usually takes brute force: Wrecking balls, huge excavators, or explosives rip apart walls while fire hoses spray water to keep the clouds of dust down. It’s an energy-intensive process, and after everything’s been torn apart, the concrete often ends up in a landfill or has to be trucked to a recycling facility. But a new concrete-erasing robot may eventually transform the messy business of demolition.

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