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You’re probably not getting enough sleep, but you might not be as far off the mark as you think.
Most sleep experts would offer that aiming for between seven to nine hours of snooze time a night is optimal for feeling refreshed and productive the next day. In a new report researchers are closing in on what may just be that magic nightly number—and it’s not nine hours, or even eight as once believed.
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You’re probably not getting enough sleep, but you might not be as far off the mark as you think.

Most sleep experts would offer that aiming for between seven to nine hours of snooze time a night is optimal for feeling refreshed and productive the next day. In a new report researchers are closing in on what may just be that magic nightly number—and it’s not nine hours, or even eight as once believed.

Read More>

Working late on a project? Why staying up all night is the worst thing you can do.
When running up against a deadline, pulling an all-nighter may seem your only option to complete a project, but a recent study published in the Swedish journal, Sleep showed that, rather than boosting productivity, staying up all night is actually harmful to your brain.
The researchers measured blood levels of certain proteins associated with brain injuries such as concussions and found protein levels were 20% higher in those who pulled all-nighters compared to when they got a full night’s rest. Although not as high as protein levels post-concussion, the study proves skimping on sleep can do real brain damage.
Dr. Ermerson Wickwire, Sleep Medicine program director at Howard County Centre for Lung and Sleep Medicine in Columbia, Maryland, and assistant professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, says that while many executives have habituated to chronic sleep loss, they are losing out on key productivity benefits of sleep by depriving their brains of a nutrient just as vital as food or water.
Why are all-nighters so harmful?
Read More>
[Image: Flickr user amboo who?]

Working late on a project? Why staying up all night is the worst thing you can do.

When running up against a deadline, pulling an all-nighter may seem your only option to complete a project, but a recent study published in the Swedish journal, Sleep showed that, rather than boosting productivity, staying up all night is actually harmful to your brain.

The researchers measured blood levels of certain proteins associated with brain injuries such as concussions and found protein levels were 20% higher in those who pulled all-nighters compared to when they got a full night’s rest. Although not as high as protein levels post-concussion, the study proves skimping on sleep can do real brain damage.

Dr. Ermerson Wickwire, Sleep Medicine program director at Howard County Centre for Lung and Sleep Medicine in Columbia, Maryland, and assistant professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, says that while many executives have habituated to chronic sleep loss, they are losing out on key productivity benefits of sleep by depriving their brains of a nutrient just as vital as food or water.

Why are all-nighters so harmful?

Read More>

[Image: Flickr user amboo who?]

The Fitibit One ($100) is Fitbit’s latest 24/7 tracking device. 
During the day, it clips to your belt or slips in your pocket to track your steps, the stairs you’ve climbed, and the overall calories you’ve burned doing so. 
At night, the One slips into an armband, where it measures your sleep cycle and will vibrate in the morning to wake you up, silently.

The Fitibit One ($100) is Fitbit’s latest 24/7 tracking device.

During the day, it clips to your belt or slips in your pocket to track your steps, the stairs you’ve climbed, and the overall calories you’ve burned doing so.

At night, the One slips into an armband, where it measures your sleep cycle and will vibrate in the morning to wake you up, silently.