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Every few months there seems to be another region somewhere in the world that claims to be the next Silicon Valley. Sometimes the new high-tech hub is hyped up, but other times, it’s evident that there’s something special brewing.
These countries have digitized governments that will put our Healthcare.gov problems to shame, fast broadband Internet speeds beyond comparison, and instead of hookup apps, you’ll see innovations in energy alternatives. These are exactly the reasons why America’s magical tech land should keep its eyes on the countries below.
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Every few months there seems to be another region somewhere in the world that claims to be the next Silicon Valley. Sometimes the new high-tech hub is hyped up, but other times, it’s evident that there’s something special brewing.

These countries have digitized governments that will put our Healthcare.gov problems to shame, fast broadband Internet speeds beyond comparison, and instead of hookup apps, you’ll see innovations in energy alternatives. These are exactly the reasons why America’s magical tech land should keep its eyes on the countries below.

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Ben Jealous is using his background as a social activist to revolutionize Silicon Valley.

Jealous likes to explain the challenge in terms anyone can understand—from Silicon Valley giants to Trekkies. “We need Captain Hernandez, not just Lieutenant Uhuru,” he says about TV’s most famous techies. “If Captain Kirk found geniuses from places as disparate as Vulcan and Scotland, we can find more of them in Harlem and Appalachia.”

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Ben Jealous is using his background as a social activist to revolutionize Silicon Valley.

Jealous likes to explain the challenge in terms anyone can understand—from Silicon Valley giants to Trekkies. “We need Captain Hernandez, not just Lieutenant Uhuru,” he says about TV’s most famous techies. “If Captain Kirk found geniuses from places as disparate as Vulcan and Scotland, we can find more of them in Harlem and Appalachia.”

Read More>

fastcodesign:

How HBO Recreated The Studiedly Zany Offices Of Silicon Valley
Silicon Valley is not your typical workplace comedy. The new HBO series, loosely based on creator Mike Judge's experience as test engineer at a tech startup in the ’80s, follows protagonist Richard Hendriks—who invents a powerful file-compression technology called Pied Piper—as he starts his own company and fights for a slice of the tech-boom pie. Along the way, we get a fictionalized glimpse of Silicon Valley office spaces—a subject easy to satirize, given how Bay Area tech giants such as Google have become famous for their zany, playground-plush offices spaces. 

Silicon Valley is a meticulously researched show—tech advisors help ensure that even scribblings on Post-It notes on set seem as realistic as possible—and the work spaces that appear on screen are no exception. Production designer Richard Toyon, the man responsible for the visual storytelling, called up friends all over Silicon Valley to get a peek inside the offices of Facebook, Google, Zynga, and others. Security often prevented Toyon from taking pictures inside the buildings, so he made due with mental notes.

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fastcodesign:

How HBO Recreated The Studiedly Zany Offices Of Silicon Valley

Silicon Valley is not your typical workplace comedy. The new HBO series, loosely based on creator Mike Judge's experience as test engineer at a tech startup in the ’80s, follows protagonist Richard Hendriks—who invents a powerful file-compression technology called Pied Piper—as he starts his own company and fights for a slice of the tech-boom pie. Along the way, we get a fictionalized glimpse of Silicon Valley office spaces—a subject easy to satirize, given how Bay Area tech giants such as Google have become famous for their zany, playground-plush offices spaces. 

image

Silicon Valley is a meticulously researched show—tech advisors help ensure that even scribblings on Post-It notes on set seem as realistic as possible—and the work spaces that appear on screen are no exception. Production designer Richard Toyon, the man responsible for the visual storytelling, called up friends all over Silicon Valley to get a peek inside the offices of Facebook, Google, Zynga, and others. Security often prevented Toyon from taking pictures inside the buildings, so he made due with mental notes.

image

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We talked to the folks behind some of Silicon Valley’s most well-known parties about the importance of play.

Tech parties often get a bad rap. At one recent event, the organizers paid for a 600-pound tiger in a cage and a monkey trained to pose for Instagram photos. Another party for a prominent Googler featured mounds of manmade snow in 70-degree weather. But not all corporate parties are the epitome of Silicon Valley excess.
In fact, historically the best Valley parties have left a huge mark on the industry

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We talked to the folks behind some of Silicon Valley’s most well-known parties about the importance of play.

Tech parties often get a bad rap. At one recent event, the organizers paid for a 600-pound tiger in a cage and a monkey trained to pose for Instagram photos. Another party for a prominent Googler featured mounds of manmade snow in 70-degree weather. But not all corporate parties are the epitome of Silicon Valley excess.

In fact, historically the best Valley parties have left a huge mark on the industry

Read More>

"There really are two kinds of food entrepreneurs," says venture capitalist Paul Matteucci, who encourages and connects food-tech upstarts through his not-for-profit, Feeding 10 Billion. “There are the ones that hang around Berkeley or Brooklyn, and build businesses mostly for the end consumer. Then there is a whole different group of highly technical people who are building robotics for the field, sensor-based technology, automated watering systems, new food-packaging technologies, and big-data-related inventory control to reduce waste.” These, he says, are “the people who are going to solve the big problems.”

A raft of entrepreneurs and venture capitalists made their money in tech, and now want to do something with an even longer-lasting impact. Meet the Silicon Valley companies trying to fix our broken food system