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After months of work and anticipation, the winner of the Co.Labs and Target Retail Accelerator contest has been announced!

The challenged asked developers and designers tobuild a new kind of retail experience on top of Target’s e-commerce platform, going from a plan to a product in just 90 days. The winner? Social shopping app called Divvy, brought home the $75,000 grand prize.

Built by Team Pilot, Divvy is meant to make shopping more efficient- especially in a group setting. With features that make it easier to split bills, share copies of receipts, maintain shared transaction history, and earn rewards points, Divvy ultimately aims to lead to less trips to the store, less time wasted shopping, and a more transparent budget/expenditure situation for a family, group, or team.

Imagine a family out and about their daily activities. One family member decides to take a trip to Target. She can add other family members or friends to the shopping list, allowing them to contribute items. The family member at Target collects and buys the items, and the other family members or friends can settle up in-app, right away, along with receiving a copy of the itemized receipt and appropriately distributed rewards points.

Team Pilot was able to complete the app to such a degree that work is already underway to release it to the public under the official Target brand. It will be Target’s fourth mobile application.

Read more about Divvy and Team Pilot here

"I was getting home late and just wanted to grab some easy pre-made food from the local supermarket. While there, I remembered that I needed a few things and navigated my way to the paper towel aisle, where I stood, transfixed, before 50 feet of options. I was tired and hungry and very suddenly annoyed. All I wanted was to be able to clean my face after eating and now I was confronted with 50 feet of choice. Screw the mustachioed Brawny man, the quicker picker upper, and the boldly named Mardi Gras.
In the midst of my existential meltdown, I left the store without buying anything.”
Studies show that too many choices intimidate consumers—can we make the purchasing process less painful?
[Paper Towel Mess: Jcjgphotography via Shutterstock]

"I was getting home late and just wanted to grab some easy pre-made food from the local supermarket. While there, I remembered that I needed a few things and navigated my way to the paper towel aisle, where I stood, transfixed, before 50 feet of options. I was tired and hungry and very suddenly annoyed. All I wanted was to be able to clean my face after eating and now I was confronted with 50 feet of choice. Screw the mustachioed Brawny man, the quicker picker upper, and the boldly named Mardi Gras.

In the midst of my existential meltdown, I left the store without buying anything.”

Studies show that too many choices intimidate consumers—can we make the purchasing process less painful?

[Paper Towel Mess: Jcjgphotography via Shutterstock]

A SURPRISING PREDICTOR IS CAR OWNERSHIP—THERE ARE CERTAIN MAKES OF CAR THAT CORRELATE FAIRLY HIGHLY TO REPUBLICAN OR DEMOCRATIC VOTING.

David Mason, a former chairman of the Federal Election Commission, is now Senior Vice President for Compliance Services at Aristotle International, a political technology company. Read more->
There’s a shopping revolution happening—and it’s taking place in stores, online, deep inside your wallet, and everywhere else transactions have traction. From the way we spend money, to the things we spend it on, to the sales outlets themselves, consumers are wandering in a wonderland of buying potential. PayPal’s “digital wallet,” Amex’s slick socializing, Square’s disruptive tech, Warby Parker’s new way of selling eyeglasses, and Fab.com’s, well, fab design site represent just a few of the people and companies at the forefront of the movement—and the innovations powering the way we shop now.
See more->

There’s a shopping revolution happening—and it’s taking place in stores, online, deep inside your wallet, and everywhere else transactions have traction. From the way we spend money, to the things we spend it on, to the sales outlets themselves, consumers are wandering in a wonderland of buying potential. PayPal’s “digital wallet,” Amex’s slick socializing, Square’s disruptive tech, Warby Parker’s new way of selling eyeglasses, and Fab.com’s, well, fab design site represent just a few of the people and companies at the forefront of the movement—and the innovations powering the way we shop now.

See more->

Ssense, a luxury retail company based out of Montreal, has recently introduced what they’re billing as the “world’s first interactive shoppable music video.” And yup, it’s pretty much exactly what it sounds like. I Think She Ready features Diplo, FKi, and Iggy Azalea all decked out and styled in brands and items carried by the site, while WireWax technology, which enables users to tag videos in essentially the same way they would a Facebook post, makes the “interactive shoppable” part possible.

Find out how it works->

"We want brands to view us as a place full of their fans and influencers," says CTO and cofounder Pasha Sadri. To that end, last fall it introduced the Polyvore Intelligence Report, a monthly set of analytics that breaks down the demographics of Polyvore users and tracks their top trends and items. The report is sent for free to select retailers, designers, and editors, revealing what shoppers want now. (Hot: fisherman sweaters and studded handbags!) 

Most Innovative Companies: #28 Polyvore

Most of the stuff we do every day happens in patterns, like how we shop. You probably have never given it so much as a thought, but the chances are you enter the supermarket and then navigate the aisles in a counter-clockwise direction. It’s been designed that way. Data compiled in a study for my new book Brandwashed surveyed 200 stores revealing that shoppers who move counter clockwise spend $2 more per shopping trip than those who wheel their trolleys in the opposite direction. Human beings are naturally more inclined to move to the left (because it’s easier to reach out with our right arm to grab whatever it is we need), so a right-side entryway is a subtle yet effective means of ensuring a counter-clockwise shopping flow.

PS Keep your right hand in your pocket the next time you go shopping – it may save you $2!

http://www.martinlindstrom.com/brandwashed/more-info.php