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Normally, we think of sharers as young, urban, and hip,” says John Burbank, president of Nielsen Strategic Initiatives. “It’s true that millennials make up half of those in the survey who said they’d be likely to rent things from others in share communities. But another quarter belong to generation X, and almost an eighth are baby boomers. They are as large a part of the story as under-20s.

The Sharing Economy Isn’t Just For Young, Coastal Urbanites Any More

More recently, there has been a surge in peer-to-peer sharing, and formal sharing institutions are quickly becoming a thing of the past. It doesn’t require an in-depth analysis to recognize the role of technology in this shift. What started online as the sharing of information has quickly turned into a full-fledged economy, with individuals sharing their homes, cars, and skills with the help of mobile devices.

What started online as the sharing of information has quickly turned into a full-fledged economy. As the sharing economy grows and individuals assume the risk of sharing personal property, they are turning to technology as a way to mitigate those risks. People renting their homes through services like Airbnb are relying on social network profiles and online reputations of potential renters to gauge who they should share their home with, while services such as TaskRabbit link directly into public records that allow them to perform background checks of potential “rabbits.”

JESSICA SCORPIO, founder of peer-to-peer car sharing service Getaround, from What’s The Future Of The Sharing Economy?

There’s a world of opportunity to re-think and re-design the way we make stuff. (Bonus: Everything sounds nicer in an English accent.)

A new study lays out a vision of the future where we get most of our resources from things we’ve already used. The one trick: It requires making things so they’re easy to reuse in the first place. But if we do, we could save billions. Continued—>

Using goods only when needed is a fundamental cultural change.
You might own some tools that you never use, or perhaps you have a  backyard that you just don’t have the time to do anything interesting  with. Until recently, those pieces of property mostly served as nagging  reminders that you didn’t have enough time to do everything you wanted  to do. Today, they can look like revenue streams, not wastes of money.
A Visual Tour Guide To Collaborative Consumption

Using goods only when needed is a fundamental cultural change.

You might own some tools that you never use, or perhaps you have a backyard that you just don’t have the time to do anything interesting with. Until recently, those pieces of property mostly served as nagging reminders that you didn’t have enough time to do everything you wanted to do. Today, they can look like revenue streams, not wastes of money.

A Visual Tour Guide To Collaborative Consumption