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Yes, the iPhone fingerprint sensor can be “hacked.” No, you shouldn’t worry about it. 

Even if the attack proves to be real, this isn’t a casual, fast trick. The attacker would have to be lucky enough to get a perfect print of the correct finger to unlock the iPhone, which means they’d have to find that specific print, or be forced to try several fake prints. Anyone this intent on hacking your iPhone would need prolonged access to it.”

More info

Will Apple’s fingerprint sensor come to Macbooks?
Apple had to do a lot of work just to make the sensor accessible in mobile devices. “You’re basically exposing a piece of silicon that’s going to be in your pocket with hard keys and coins. We were able to evolve the technology to address aesthetics and durability.”

Will Apple’s fingerprint sensor come to Macbooks?

Apple had to do a lot of work just to make the sensor accessible in mobile devices. “You’re basically exposing a piece of silicon that’s going to be in your pocket with hard keys and coins. We were able to evolve the technology to address aesthetics and durability.”

They were peppering my husband with questions. Where is he from? Where are his parents from? They asked about me, where was I, where do I work, where do my parents live. Do you have any bombs, they asked. Do you own a pressure cooker? My husband said no, but we have a rice cooker. Can you make a bomb with that? My husband said no, my wife uses it to make quinoa. What the hell is quinoa, they asked…

In the new America, a woman and her husband were questioned by their local police department when two separate Google searches converged in an unpleasant way. But how did the police find out what they were Googling?

If you Google “pressure cooker” and “backpacks,” the police may visit your home… 

Daily Fast Feed Roundup

Good morning Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 
Google will tap into its inner nerd during the upcoming Geek Week (Aug 4-10), which is meant to promote its original content.
The new Nexus 7 tablet has gone on pre-order before Google even had a chance to reveal it.
BBC Researchers have come up with a concept for how to send astronauts to Mars, and then bring them back.
Would you hand over your personal data to the TSA if it got you through airport security faster? 
Heads up all you hopeless e-romantics, a security flaw within the dating app Tinder exposed users’ locations and Facebook IDs for two hours last weekend.
Hmm, is your data safe with Citibike? A glitch exposed the credit card info of more than 1,000 users in April.
Get ready to see lots of promoted tweets during your favorite TV shows, because Twitter is giving a big push to its TV ad targeting feature for brands. 
Apple’s third-quarter earnings show record-setting iPhone sales but declining numbers for the iPad. 
NYC mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner’s sexting alter-ego has a name, and it is Carlos Danger.
Edward Snowden has been given permission to leave the Sheremetyevo airport, as long as he stays in Russia. 
A Kickstarter campaign has been launched for a Superteddy bear that would be able to chat naturally using Siri-like technology.
Have a great day!
—M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Daily Fast Feed Roundup

Good morning Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 

  • Google will tap into its inner nerd during the upcoming Geek Week (Aug 4-10), which is meant to promote its original content.
  • BBC Researchers have come up with a concept for how to send astronauts to Mars, and then bring them back.

Have a great day!

M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Daily Fast Feed Roundup
Good morning Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 
The shut down of an Apple developer center last week may have been triggered by the security researcher who pointed out some of Apple’s bugs and potential cyber weaknesses. 
Word on the street has it that Apple is testing iPads and iPhones with larger screens.
Yahoo just bought back $1.16 billion in shares from hedge fund investor Third Point LLC. 
An encryption flaw in some SIM cards means that roughly 750 million phones can be hacked in a matter of minutes via text message. 
Celebrated statistician and 2013’s most creative person, Nate Silver, is leaving The New York Times for ESPN. 
Here is why you will see many more 3-D printers next year.
Twitter co-founder Biz Stone thinks that Facebook should go premium with a paid ad-free version.
Have a great week!
—M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Daily Fast Feed Roundup

Good morning Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 

Have a great week!

M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Tumblr has fixed a security flaw it found on its iOS app.
Very little information was given about the bug, but the firm suggested users change their passwords immediately.
This was posted yesterday on the staff blog.

We have just released a very important security update for our iPhone and iPad apps addressing an issue that allowed passwords to be compromised in certain circumstances. Please download the update now.
If you’ve been using these apps, you should also update your password on Tumblr and anywhere else you may have been using the same password. 
Please know that we take your security very seriously and are tremendously sorry for this lapse and inconvenience.

So change your password peeps!

Tumblr has fixed a security flaw it found on its iOS app.

Very little information was given about the bug, but the firm suggested users change their passwords immediately.

This was posted yesterday on the staff blog.

We have just released a very important security update for our iPhone and iPad apps addressing an issue that allowed passwords to be compromised in certain circumstances. Please download the update now.

If you’ve been using these apps, you should also update your password on Tumblr and anywhere else you may have been using the same password. 

Please know that we take your security very seriously and are tremendously sorry for this lapse and inconvenience.

So change your password peeps!

If it’s not SSL, you’re screwed.

Cyber Monday tip: We’ve been told for years that on any site that’s requesting your credit card number, you should be absolutely sure you see HTTPS in the browser bar and a padlock icon in the browser, yet millions of people continue to be taken in by this simple scam. Beyond the risk of someone “eavesdropping” on your sensitive information, the lack of SSL is a sure sign that you’re not dealing with a reputable store. Adding SSL to a site can cost as little as $10 and has been de rigueur for almost fifteen years, so any site lacking this basic protection is a huge red flag (but because it’s only $10, the presence of that padlock doesn’t mean very much by itself).

More Cyber Monday tips from Dayna Steele here!

At a Congressional hearing this morning that veered into contentious arguments and cringe-worthy moments, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) spilled the beans on their social media monitoring project.
DHS Chief Privacy Office Mary Ellen Callahan and Director of Operations Coordination and Planning Richard Chavez appeared to be deliberately stonewalling Congress on the depth, ubiquity, goals, and technical capabilities of the agency’s social media surveillance. At other times, they appeared to be themselves unsure about their own project’s ultimate goals and uses. But one thing is for sure: If you’re the first person to tweet about a news story, or if you’re a community activist who makes public Facebook posts—DHS will have your personal information.

 Department Of Homeland Security Tells Congress Why It’s Monitoring Facebook, Twitter, Blogs

At a Congressional hearing this morning that veered into contentious arguments and cringe-worthy moments, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) spilled the beans on their social media monitoring project.

DHS Chief Privacy Office Mary Ellen Callahan and Director of Operations Coordination and Planning Richard Chavez appeared to be deliberately stonewalling Congress on the depth, ubiquity, goals, and technical capabilities of the agency’s social media surveillance. At other times, they appeared to be themselves unsure about their own project’s ultimate goals and uses. But one thing is for sure: If you’re the first person to tweet about a news story, or if you’re a community activist who makes public Facebook posts—DHS will have your personal information.

Department Of Homeland Security Tells Congress Why It’s Monitoring Facebook, Twitter, Blogs