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“Organs-on-a-chip” don’t look like much: They are very thin clear pieces of plastic, but when they are filled with cells, they take on a life of their own and mimic human systems far more effectively than simple petri dish cell cultures. - The Coming Human Body On A Chip That Will Change How We Make Drugs
No more animal testing and no more guesswork about whether drugs that work on animals might also work on humans. Scientists are making an entire electonic set of organs that can test our drugs quickly and easily.
Read More>

“Organs-on-a-chip” don’t look like much: They are very thin clear pieces of plastic, but when they are filled with cells, they take on a life of their own and mimic human systems far more effectively than simple petri dish cell cultures. - The Coming Human Body On A Chip That Will Change How We Make Drugs

No more animal testing and no more guesswork about whether drugs that work on animals might also work on humans. Scientists are making an entire electonic set of organs that can test our drugs quickly and easily.

Read More>

Why are advertising students in Alaska studying climate change? The question, says Deborah Morrison, is why isn’t the ad industry studying, and putting its creative might behind climate change, and humanity’s other BIG briefs.
“Why aren’t we as an industry front-and-center in working on the great, wicked issues of our day?”
Read More>

Why are advertising students in Alaska studying climate change? The question, says Deborah Morrison, is why isn’t the ad industry studying, and putting its creative might behind climate change, and humanity’s other BIG briefs.

Why aren’t we as an industry front-and-center in working on the great, wicked issues of our day?”

Read More>

You may have seen the viral video “Old Man In Nursing Home Reacts To Music.” Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett talks about that moment and his documentary about reaching through dementia with music.

"Our film addresses some subjects people don’t like to talk about, yet it’s a joyous experience because we show that people suffering from memory loss still have this life inside that runs incredibly deep."
Read More>

You may have seen the viral video “Old Man In Nursing Home Reacts To Music.” Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett talks about that moment and his documentary about reaching through dementia with music.

image

"Our film addresses some subjects people don’t like to talk about, yet it’s a joyous experience because we show that people suffering from memory loss still have this life inside that runs incredibly deep."

Read More>

jtotheizzoe:

generalelectric:

Pictured above is the world’s largest indoor farm illuminated by LEDs, which opened this month in Japan. Inside, 18 cultivation racks reach 15 levels high, and are outfitted with 17,500 GE LED light fixtures developed specifically for this facility. The indoor farm can grow lettuce two-and-a-half times faster than an outdoor farm, and is already producing 10,000 heads of it per day. Read more about this breakthrough in modern farming at GE Reports.   

Can you imagine showing this to a farmer who was alive and planting just 50 years ago? They’d think we were space aliens.

You’re probably not getting enough sleep, but you might not be as far off the mark as you think.
Most sleep experts would offer that aiming for between seven to nine hours of snooze time a night is optimal for feeling refreshed and productive the next day. In a new report researchers are closing in on what may just be that magic nightly number—and it’s not nine hours, or even eight as once believed.
Read More>

You’re probably not getting enough sleep, but you might not be as far off the mark as you think.

Most sleep experts would offer that aiming for between seven to nine hours of snooze time a night is optimal for feeling refreshed and productive the next day. In a new report researchers are closing in on what may just be that magic nightly number—and it’s not nine hours, or even eight as once believed.

Read More>

These Incredible Photos From Astronauts Show The Brightest Cities On Earth 

Cities at Night was launched by some Spanish astrophysicists who started following an astronaut’s Twitter account. “For us his nighttime pictures were like fire for a firefighter—it’s pretty, but you must control it,” says Alejandro Sanchez from Complutense University of Madrid. “We want to make the nighttime images useful for citizens, journalists, and scientists. And make this beauty accessible—but also make people think about if all this waste of energy is really needed.”

See the entire slideshow here>

Director Mike Cahill on how iris-scanning technology, Richard Dawkins, and a TED talk inspired his new film, I Origins.

Cahill based Pitt’s Ian Gray character loosely on scientist Richard Dawkins. “The scanning of the color part of your eye has been around since 1987 when he figured out the algorithm and it’s been a slow-growing technology over the years. Nowadays in New York City if a person is arrested they get their eye scanned, babies in hospitals get their eyes scanned, you can go through the fast lane at the airport if you do your iris scan.”
The filmmaker became further sold on the power of iris scans after checking out a TED Talk by Jeff Carter. “He talks about how fingerprints only give you so many degrees of accuracy, where as the patterns in your eyes form when you’re in your mother’s womb and stay the same for you for your entire life,” Cahill notes. “From a technological standpoint, it’s a great way to ID a person. And since the eye has also enticed poets since the dawn of civilization, it seemed like a wonderful meeting place for two of my greatest passions—science and spirituality.”

Director Mike Cahill on how iris-scanning technology, Richard Dawkins, and a TED talk inspired his new film, I Origins.

image

Cahill based Pitt’s Ian Gray character loosely on scientist Richard Dawkins. “The scanning of the color part of your eye has been around since 1987 when he figured out the algorithm and it’s been a slow-growing technology over the years. Nowadays in New York City if a person is arrested they get their eye scanned, babies in hospitals get their eyes scanned, you can go through the fast lane at the airport if you do your iris scan.”

The filmmaker became further sold on the power of iris scans after checking out a TED Talk by Jeff Carter. “He talks about how fingerprints only give you so many degrees of accuracy, where as the patterns in your eyes form when you’re in your mother’s womb and stay the same for you for your entire life,” Cahill notes. “From a technological standpoint, it’s a great way to ID a person. And since the eye has also enticed poets since the dawn of civilization, it seemed like a wonderful meeting place for two of my greatest passions—science and spirituality.”