FastCompany Magazine

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Infographic: Every Trip To The Moon, Ever
Who remembered that we’d gotten it wrong so many times?
Once the U.S. planted a flag on the moon, it was easy to forget the trials and tribulations of the space race. But did you know that the United States and Soviet Union combined for eight failed missions to the moon within a single year? Eventually, the U.S. got the Pioneer 4 (their fifth attempt) to do a successful flyby in 1959. The Soviet Union followed a few months later by topping us big time—they actually landed with their Luna 2, a probe that looks straight out of 1960s sci-fi television. It’s a story that you can follow in this pair of infographics created by Margot Trudell as part of her OCAD graduate thesis.
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Infographic: Every Trip To The Moon, Ever

Who remembered that we’d gotten it wrong so many times?

Once the U.S. planted a flag on the moon, it was easy to forget the trials and tribulations of the space race. But did you know that the United States and Soviet Union combined for eight failed missions to the moon within a single year? Eventually, the U.S. got the Pioneer 4 (their fifth attempt) to do a successful flyby in 1959. The Soviet Union followed a few months later by topping us big time—they actually landed with their Luna 2, a probe that looks straight out of 1960s sci-fi television. It’s a story that you can follow in this pair of infographics created by Margot Trudell as part of her OCAD graduate thesis.

Read More>

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Fantastical NonfictionNames that tune in 3 notes No, it’s not a contestant from the classic TV game show. It’s an IBM computer that uses algorithmic computation to identify a song’s musical period—Baroque, Classical or Romantic— in only three notes. And when applied to speech patterns, the same technology can be used as an early warning system for Parkinson’s disease and certain kinds of psychiatric disorders. Read on →

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Fantastical Nonfiction
Names that tune in 3 notes

No, it’s not a contestant from the classic TV game show. It’s an IBM computer that uses algorithmic computation to identify a song’s musical period—Baroque, Classical or Romantic— in only three notes. And when applied to speech patterns, the same technology can be used as an early warning system for Parkinson’s disease and certain kinds of psychiatric disorders. 
Read on →

Bee hives are a little terrifying. Colonies have 20,000 to 60,000 bees, all of whom beat their wings 200 times per second. It’s amazing, then, that videographer-photographer Michael Sutton, was only stung three times while shooting his high-speed short, Apis Mellifera: Honey Bee.
Watch>

Bee hives are a little terrifying. Colonies have 20,000 to 60,000 bees, all of whom beat their wings 200 times per second. It’s amazing, then, that videographer-photographer Michael Sutton, was only stung three times while shooting his high-speed short, Apis Mellifera: Honey Bee.

Watch>

neurosciencestuff:


Hypnosis: The day my mind was ‘possessed’
I am lying on my back and trapped in a gleaming white tunnel, the surface barely six inches from my nose. There is a strange mechanical rumbling in the background, and I hear footsteps padding around the room beyond. In my mounting claustrophobia, I ask myself why I am here – but there is no way out now. A few moments later, the light dims, and as the man speaks, my thoughts begin to fade.
“The engineer has developed a way of taking control of your thoughts from the inside. He does this because he is fascinated by mind control, and wants to apply the most direct method of controlling your thoughts. He is doing this to advance his research into mind control. You will soon be aware of the engineer inserting his thoughts.”
A strange serenity descends as I realise that soon, my will won’t be my own. Then the experiment begins. I am about to be possessed.

Read more

neurosciencestuff:

Hypnosis: The day my mind was ‘possessed’

I am lying on my back and trapped in a gleaming white tunnel, the surface barely six inches from my nose. There is a strange mechanical rumbling in the background, and I hear footsteps padding around the room beyond. In my mounting claustrophobia, I ask myself why I am here – but there is no way out now. A few moments later, the light dims, and as the man speaks, my thoughts begin to fade.

“The engineer has developed a way of taking control of your thoughts from the inside. He does this because he is fascinated by mind control, and wants to apply the most direct method of controlling your thoughts. He is doing this to advance his research into mind control. You will soon be aware of the engineer inserting his thoughts.”

A strange serenity descends as I realise that soon, my will won’t be my own. Then the experiment begins. I am about to be possessed.

Read more