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The RoboTuna’s latest iteration comes by way of MIT, and cloaked in soft teal silicone. The fish, which keeps all of its computation and sensors in its head, contains a carbon dioxide canister that puffs pockets of gas to different parts of the body, making it undulate. It can also do something called a C-turn, an escape mechanism real fish pull off to avoid predators.
Meet the latest, greatest robo-fish

The RoboTuna’s latest iteration comes by way of MIT, and cloaked in soft teal silicone. The fish, which keeps all of its computation and sensors in its head, contains a carbon dioxide canister that puffs pockets of gas to different parts of the body, making it undulate. It can also do something called a C-turn, an escape mechanism real fish pull off to avoid predators.

Meet the latest, greatest robo-fish

Mind Reading Comes One Step Closer To Reality With The Glass Brain
What if you could see inside someone’s mind? It’s not possible to know exactly what another person is thinking, but neuroscientists from UCSD and UCSF are on their way. They created a “glass brain”: software that shows a person’s brain reacting to stimuli in real time. The implications for virtual reality and digital communication are tremendous, according to Philip Rosedale, the founder of Second Life, who has been collaborating with the neuroscientists.
“We’re trying to identify which critical factors can most help people feel like they’re face to face,” says Rosedale, whose new company, High Fidelity, is currently working on a next generation virtual world.
More> Co.Create

Mind Reading Comes One Step Closer To Reality With The Glass Brain

What if you could see inside someone’s mind? It’s not possible to know exactly what another person is thinking, but neuroscientists from UCSD and UCSF are on their way. They created a “glass brain”: software that shows a person’s brain reacting to stimuli in real time. The implications for virtual reality and digital communication are tremendous, according to Philip Rosedale, the founder of Second Life, who has been collaborating with the neuroscientists.

“We’re trying to identify which critical factors can most help people feel like they’re face to face,” says Rosedale, whose new company, High Fidelity, is currently working on a next generation virtual world.

More> Co.Create

Andrew Zolli: Why have art in space at all? What does it say about us as a species?
Forest Stearns: Symbolic mark-making has always been an important part of the human experience. From caves to canvases to satellites, we all have an ambition to tell our story. And as we migrate upwards and outwards with space technology, we felt it was important to take this expressive instinct with us.
More> These Mini Satellites Have An Unexpected Addition: Beautiful Art

Andrew ZolliWhy have art in space at all? What does it say about us as a species?

Forest Stearns: Symbolic mark-making has always been an important part of the human experience. From caves to canvases to satellites, we all have an ambition to tell our story. And as we migrate upwards and outwards with space technology, we felt it was important to take this expressive instinct with us.

More> These Mini Satellites Have An Unexpected Addition: Beautiful Art

The Fascinating Neuroscience Of Color
Neuroscientist Bevil Conway believes scientists can learn a lot from examining the strategies artists use to clarify color. “The best access we have of what color is and what it does to us is by studying the work of people who have studied it obsessively. Matisse is one of those people,” he says. “I think it’s extremely valuable, and there’s been very limited work treating that corpus as the sort of scientific evidence that it will turn out to be.”
More> Co.Design

The Fascinating Neuroscience Of Color

Neuroscientist Bevil Conway believes scientists can learn a lot from examining the strategies artists use to clarify color. “The best access we have of what color is and what it does to us is by studying the work of people who have studied it obsessively. Matisse is one of those people,” he says. “I think it’s extremely valuable, and there’s been very limited work treating that corpus as the sort of scientific evidence that it will turn out to be.”

More> Co.Design

After the TED talk, Hadfield met with press to discuss all things space. And I had to ask: what does Hadfield think about all the private space companies, like Virgin Galactic and SpaceX, that are popping up? Can they really democratize spaceflight?

"You could ask the exact same question a century ago about airplanes. We’re at 1912 or maybe 1915 in spaceflight. The shuttle is a ridiculous vehicle, and yet it’s the best in the world.

Astronaut Chris Hadfield

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More> Everyone’s Favorite Astronaut Chris Hadfield On Why He Is Pro SpaceX, Anti “Gravity”

So even as we kind of hate child prodigies, we remain in awe of their gifts. For a long time, scientists had little insight into the nature of these talents. But over the past several years psychologist Joanne Ruthsatz has assembled what she calls the “largest sample” of prodigies on record—a list more than 30 deep and growing—and what she’s found points to one factor that’s consistently off the charts among prodigies regardless of their area of focus: working memory.

“They all have exceptional memories,” Ruthsatz tells Co.Design. “I think it’s the piece that allows for their abilities.

The One Extraordinary Skill All Prodigies Share

A Science Odyssey: How The Makers Of “Cosmos” Reinvented A TV Classic
“One of the crimes of sequels is thinking that making it bigger means better. Here, Cosmos is bigger, because we know more about what’s happened in last 14 billion years and here’s a venue in which to place real phenomena. It’s bigger, because the universe is bigger and we can tell that story.” - Neil deGrasse Tyson
More> Co.Create

A Science Odyssey: How The Makers Of “Cosmos” Reinvented A TV Classic

“One of the crimes of sequels is thinking that making it bigger means better. Here, Cosmos is bigger, because we know more about what’s happened in last 14 billion years and here’s a venue in which to place real phenomena. It’s bigger, because the universe is bigger and we can tell that story.” - Neil deGrasse Tyson

More> Co.Create

  • "…it snaps a photo of the fridge’s contents whenever you open the door, allowing you to check what food you already have before you stop off at the store on your way home from work.”

  • Your SmartThings hub could detect that you’ve woken up, either through a motion sensor outside your bedroom or a biometric wristband like the Jawbone Up, and turn on the lights in your kitchen and activate the outlet to which your coffee pot is connected, starting the coffee brewing if you had the foresight to put the grinds in the night before. When you enter the kitchen, motion sensors could trigger a Sonos speaker to give you a weather report and play the news. When you leave for work, the home senses that you are gone and shuts everything down.”

2014: The year companies try to make the kitchen the smartest room in the house