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Where we’re going, we’ll need roads. But before long-term settlers arrive on Mars or the moon, one engineer is working under a NASA grant to make sure that the proper infrastructure is already in place.
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Where we’re going, we’ll need roads. But before long-term settlers arrive on Mars or the moon, one engineer is working under a NASA grant to make sure that the proper infrastructure is already in place.

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Why We Can’t Stop Obsessing Over Flying Saucers
Will the test vehicle get the altitude and velocity it needs to prove we can fly in the Martian atmosphere?
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Why We Can’t Stop Obsessing Over Flying Saucers

Will the test vehicle get the altitude and velocity it needs to prove we can fly in the Martian atmosphere?

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Behold, The World’s First Space-Vine

In only a year and a half of Vine, we’ve seen six-second loops of just about everything under the sun. With a recent dispatch from space, however, we’ve apparently moved on from underneath and are now broadcasting Vines from somewhere more adjacent to the sun.

Astronaut Reid Wiseman has posted the first-ever Vine video sent from space.

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A Very Special “Everything Wrong With” Featuring Neil DeGrasse Tyson And “Gravity”

The “Everything Wrong With” series from Cinema Sins is a popular, fun way to make you feel dumb for liking things (yet smart for knowing why you shouldn’t). The latest edition of the ongoing series has a special guest who can make you feel especially stupid for enjoying Gravity: Namely, Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson, America’s favorite astrophysicist, who interjects with some very science-y reasons why the Sandra Bullock mega-hit is bad and you should feel bad for liking it.

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Robonaut, installed on the International Space Station to perform chores for astronauts, just got its first pair of real legs.

NASA says that the new seven-jointed legs are designed for climbing in zero gravity and offer a considerable nine-foot leg span. Instead of feet, the legs feature “end effectors” designed to grapple onto handrails and sockets located both inside the space station and, eventually, on the ISS’s exterior. Robonaut’s end effectors have a built-in vision system—almost like a pair of eyes—that are designed to eventually automate each limb’s approaching and grasping.

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Robonaut, installed on the International Space Station to perform chores for astronauts, just got its first pair of real legs.

NASA says that the new seven-jointed legs are designed for climbing in zero gravity and offer a considerable nine-foot leg span. Instead of feet, the legs feature “end effectors” designed to grapple onto handrails and sockets located both inside the space station and, eventually, on the ISS’s exterior. Robonaut’s end effectors have a built-in vision system—almost like a pair of eyes—that are designed to eventually automate each limb’s approaching and grasping.

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