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Okay, this is admittedly a little annoying at first, but if you hang in there, at around 1:42 you will be glad you did!

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Editor’s note: The following is a guest post from tech video producer Jason Sanchez, who sends us rockin’ ideas for the Tumblr all the time. We’re hoping to recruit him to the dark side soon.

Clearly, this is why Al Gore created the Internet: To blow our minds with videos of…

Jamie Gurnell loves Radiohead so much, he made a chart showing how the veteran alt-rockers have dabbled in multiple genres over the years.

 
Gurnell wanted to classify the activities of a band he deems “the very definition of ‘unclassifiable.’” The product of “several hours of quite enjoyable listening and debate,” his infographic is, of course, just one man’s opinion of Radiohead’s musical zigs and zags over its 18-year existence (technically the band was formed in 1985, but its first real release, “Pablo Honey,” came out in 1993). Besides the fact that the band is in essence more alt-rock than electronic, they’re literally all over the map.
If you like their wonky electronic work as much as I do, simply follow the vertical line down the center of the graph (“Kid A” and “Amnesiac” are obviously represented, but so is “Pablo Honey”). And if you think that the band has gotten hopelessly esoteric since its blockbuster 1995 release “The Bends,” the graph proves that even later albums like “Hail to the Thief” and “In Rainbows” offer plenty of straight-ahead alt-rock tracks.

 
Looks good, but he could’ve saved all the trouble and just slapped the songs in one genre: Boring. Ha ha ha, we kid, no, seriously, we’re kidding, ow, stop unfollowing us, Radiohead is cool, chill out!!

Jamie Gurnell loves Radiohead so much, he made a chart showing how the veteran alt-rockers have dabbled in multiple genres over the years.

Gurnell wanted to classify the activities of a band he deems “the very definition of ‘unclassifiable.’” The product of “several hours of quite enjoyable listening and debate,” his infographic is, of course, just one man’s opinion of Radiohead’s musical zigs and zags over its 18-year existence (technically the band was formed in 1985, but its first real release, “Pablo Honey,” came out in 1993). Besides the fact that the band is in essence more alt-rock than electronic, they’re literally all over the map.

If you like their wonky electronic work as much as I do, simply follow the vertical line down the center of the graph (“Kid A” and “Amnesiac” are obviously represented, but so is “Pablo Honey”). And if you think that the band has gotten hopelessly esoteric since its blockbuster 1995 release “The Bends,” the graph proves that even later albums like “Hail to the Thief” and “In Rainbows” offer plenty of straight-ahead alt-rock tracks.

Looks good, but he could’ve saved all the trouble and just slapped the songs in one genre: Boring. Ha ha ha, we kid, no, seriously, we’re kidding, ow, stop unfollowing us, Radiohead is cool, chill out!!

This had to happen: Just three years after Radiohead used pro-level laser LIDAR scanners to craft a 3-D music video unlike any you’d seen before, an enterprising hacker has tweaked a Microsoft Kinect to produce a startlingly similar video.

Echo Lake’s single Young Silence is due for release soon—on Valentine’s Day, actually—but it’s already had its music video premier on Vimeo. The video was crafted by Dan Nixon, a Brighton, U.K,-based filmmaker. Nixon also writes and runs a small indie record label, but it’s his fillmmaking and computer skills we’re celebrating here.

On December 14th of last year Nixon and colleague Dom Jones shot Echo Lake performing their song using a Microsoft Kinect as a camera. Then Nixon “spent the next seven weeks (mostly after work)” transforming the digital footage by hand using “custom applications developed in Cinder” and publicly available Kinect hacking files.

It’s impressive. But what you should take away from this is that an enterprising hacker used a $50 piece of gaming hardware and hacker-community code (plus seven weeks of spare-time) to produce a music video that is hugely reminiscent of Radiohead’s ground-breaking video for House of Cards back in 2008. That video relied on all sorts of complex and expensive tech to produce—including laser LIDAR scanners that act like light-based radar systems.

See the “making of” video here, and then marvel at how quickly technology has leaped in just a couple of years. And then ponder what a runaway success Microsoft has, partly accidentally, on its hands.