FastCompany Magazine

The official Tumblr of Fast Company.

Daily Fast Feed Roundup
Hi Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 
Rejoice! Google has brought back the ability to make calls from Gmail. 
BlackBerryhas lost its battle with Indian authorities, who have been demanding that it let them spy on users in order to protect the state and prevent terrorism.
Apple has been found guilty of conspiring with five major book publishers to artificially raise e-book prices. 
Today’s Most Innovative Company is NASA, which is planning to send a new rover to Mars in 2020.
Today’s Most Creative People are the students behind NASA’s awesome Grover rover. 
A code found buried in the iOS 7 beta is a clue that the new iPhone may have a slow motion camera.
A new, more accurate clock that uses lasers to help tell time may change our definition of the second.
Ever trekked all the way to a cafe just to find out that their Wi-fi is lousy? Now you can avoid that inconvenience using the SeedSpot app, which lets you test the Wi-Fi networks in your area.
Google just cleaned up the Android Maps app, giving it a sleeker, more useable design.
Hackers are taking advantage of Microsoft’s security flaw, which was announced earlier this year by a Google employee. 
Have a great day!
—M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

[Image: flattop341]

Daily Fast Feed Roundup

Hi Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 

  • BlackBerryhas lost its battle with Indian authorities, who have been demanding that it let them spy on users in order to protect the state and prevent terrorism.

Have a great day!

M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

[Image: flattop341]

This hoodie top is specially designed to conceal your identity from closed-circuit television. It’s a project by artist Adam Harvey, and part of a line of similar pieces of clothing he’s created. It’s made of metallic reflective fabric not unlike the protective material used in some layers of firemen’s uniforms. The idea is that the material smears out or otherwise conceals your body’s thermal output and that can confuse overhead surveillance cameras—like those you sometimes see used on late-night cops reality shows.
A virtual fashion show of newly-emerging counter-surveillance gear

This hoodie top is specially designed to conceal your identity from closed-circuit television. It’s a project by artist Adam Harvey, and part of a line of similar pieces of clothing he’s created. It’s made of metallic reflective fabric not unlike the protective material used in some layers of firemen’s uniforms. The idea is that the material smears out or otherwise conceals your body’s thermal output and that can confuse overhead surveillance cameras—like those you sometimes see used on late-night cops reality shows.

A virtual fashion show of newly-emerging counter-surveillance gear

Daily Fast Feed Roundup
Happy Monday! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 
Now you can use Google Street View to see the view from the top of the world’s highest building, the Burj Khalifa tower in Dubai. 
Former South African president Nelson Mandela is still in critical condition with a lung infection, says President Zuma.
From our NSA secret surveillance tracker: Whistleblower Edward Snowden was expected to take a plane to Havana today, but at the time of takeoff, he was nowhere to be found. 
Australian lawmakers hold off on plans to track and store phone call and email data after NSA surveillance scandal raises privacy concerns worldwide. 
Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer has its top managers squirming with his plan to restructure the company.
Facebook is working on its own news reader. Watch out for our Google Reader replacement roundup later today.
The FTC is investigating Google’s purchase of the Israeli social navigation firm Waze after consumer groups and tech experts raise concerns.
Have a great week! —M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Daily Fast Feed Roundup

Happy Monday! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 


Have a great week! —M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Snowden is reportedly a no-show for his flight from Moscow to Havana, which is packed to the brim with reporters chomping at the bit to speak with him. Gawker editor Max Reed tweeted: “A dozen journalists stuck on dry flight to Cuba watching the James Franco Oz movie.” Now the question on every conspiracy theorist’s lips is this: Did Snowden actually make it to Moscow, or is this one of the best post-Soviet intelligence ops we’ve seen in a long time? Stay tuned.

How the NSA monitors America’s phone traffic

scoop from The Guardian confirmed what many people suspected—the National Security Agency (NSA) is spying on the phone activity of millions of Americans. Using a secret court order, which was not disclosed to the public, the NSA obtained bulk phone records for Verizon’s customers on a daily basis. Each day, the NSA would receive a massive flood of data from Verizon.

How do they do it, and what can they do with the information? 

This has never been done before,” boasts Mike Janke, Silent Circle’s CEO. “It’s going to revolutionize the ease of privacy and security.

The Threat Of Silence

The privacy experts over at Silent Circle have announced a new encryption data transfer app that will let people send files securely from their iPhone or tablets. 

The technology uses a sophisticated peer-to-peer encryption technique that allows users to send encrypted files of up to 60 megabytes through a “Silent Text” app. The sender of the file can set it on a timer so that it will automatically “burn”—deleting it from both devices after a set period of, say, seven minutes. 

This app is sure to fuel government paranoia since it keeps its users and their information virtually untraceable. 

Click here the full story.

If it’s not SSL, you’re screwed.

Cyber Monday tip: We’ve been told for years that on any site that’s requesting your credit card number, you should be absolutely sure you see HTTPS in the browser bar and a padlock icon in the browser, yet millions of people continue to be taken in by this simple scam. Beyond the risk of someone “eavesdropping” on your sensitive information, the lack of SSL is a sure sign that you’re not dealing with a reputable store. Adding SSL to a site can cost as little as $10 and has been de rigueur for almost fifteen years, so any site lacking this basic protection is a huge red flag (but because it’s only $10, the presence of that padlock doesn’t mean very much by itself).

More Cyber Monday tips from Dayna Steele here!