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No one wants their private emails or pictures out there for the world to see. Here’s how to make them more secure.
In light of some disconcerting news recently involving cyber creeps picking through our private accounts, this Friday we’re offering you a hack that will not only make your accounts a little more secure, but hopefully will put your minds somewhat at ease. Should we call this edition the no-hack hack?
One of the best ways to step up your online security is by activating two-step authentication on your private accounts. Both Google and iCloud make this process available, and although many begrudge the onus placed on customers to be proactive about their security, making this kind of security a default is still a thing of the future, so it’s up to us as consumers to take an active role in our privacy. Here’s how to get started:
Read More>

No one wants their private emails or pictures out there for the world to see. Here’s how to make them more secure.

In light of some disconcerting news recently involving cyber creeps picking through our private accounts, this Friday we’re offering you a hack that will not only make your accounts a little more secure, but hopefully will put your minds somewhat at ease. Should we call this edition the no-hack hack?

One of the best ways to step up your online security is by activating two-step authentication on your private accounts. Both Google and iCloud make this process available, and although many begrudge the onus placed on customers to be proactive about their security, making this kind of security a default is still a thing of the future, so it’s up to us as consumers to take an active role in our privacy. Here’s how to get started:

Read More>

A study from AVAST published Wednesday found one in five men and one in four women admit to checking their partners’ smartphones without their consent. Surveying 13,132 respondents in the U.S., AVAST said a quarter of married women who did check their spouses’ phones did so out of suspicions of infidelity. However, most women did so “because they are nosey,” the company said.

Your Significant Other Is Probably Snooping On Your Smartphone
Once upon a time, whistleblowers relied on tricks like fake glasses and invisible ink to conceal their identities. Now those analog disguises are getting a digital makeover, thanks to a project called Invisible.im.
Read More>

Once upon a time, whistleblowers relied on tricks like fake glasses and invisible ink to conceal their identities. Now those analog disguises are getting a digital makeover, thanks to a project called Invisible.im.

Read More>

Kaliya Hamlin, or Kaliya Identity Woman, as she’€™s known, is a driving, entrepreneurial force for a new kind of ethical data economy: One that puts control of our personal information back into the individual’€™s hands. Join Fast Company reporter Sydney Brownstone as she chats live with Kaliya on Friday, February 7th at 1pm Eastern.

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