FastCompany Magazine

The official Tumblr of Fast Company.

What Do 769 Soccer Balls, Ocean Pollution, And Space Have In Common?
Just in time for the World Cup, the UK-based artist has transformed this waste into an eye-catching photo series, called Penalty, which aims to raise awareness about marine plastic pollution in the world’s oceans. Arranged against black, the colorful, sea-gnarled balls resemble galaxies of waste. Viewed abstractly, the images are simply beautiful. But they take on a more sinister aspect when you realize they represent just a tiny fraction of the pollution clogging our oceans.
See More>

What Do 769 Soccer Balls, Ocean Pollution, And Space Have In Common?

Just in time for the World Cup, the UK-based artist has transformed this waste into an eye-catching photo series, called Penalty, which aims to raise awareness about marine plastic pollution in the world’s oceans. Arranged against black, the colorful, sea-gnarled balls resemble galaxies of waste. Viewed abstractly, the images are simply beautiful. But they take on a more sinister aspect when you realize they represent just a tiny fraction of the pollution clogging our oceans.

See More>

This Floating Billboard Is Cleaning Up A Polluted River in Manila
20 years ago, Manila’s Pasig River was considered biologically dead. But there is a campaign to rehabilitate the waterway that cuts through the city and now a Japanese natural cosmetics brand is using a creative billboard to lend a hand in the cleanup efforts. … Spelling out “Clean River Soon,” according to the brand the installation is capable of cleaning between 2,000 and 8,000 gallons of water every day.
Slideshow> 

This Floating Billboard Is Cleaning Up A Polluted River in Manila

20 years ago, Manila’s Pasig River was considered biologically dead. But there is a campaign to rehabilitate the waterway that cuts through the city and now a Japanese natural cosmetics brand is using a creative billboard to lend a hand in the cleanup efforts. … Spelling out “Clean River Soon,” according to the brand the installation is capable of cleaning between 2,000 and 8,000 gallons of water every day.

Slideshow> 

"It is a strange process to suck the pollution out of the air and have it in our hands a few minutes later," Roosegaarde says. "It looks like a mystic black powder, but most mesmerizing about this is that normally you would have to breathe it."
Read More>

"It is a strange process to suck the pollution out of the air and have it in our hands a few minutes later," Roosegaarde says. "It looks like a mystic black powder, but most mesmerizing about this is that normally you would have to breathe it."

Read More>

Daily Fast Feed Roundup
Good morning Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 
A patent trolling’ firm called Eolas was just crushed in court. A win for web innovators every where.
Finland is set to vote on a set of fairer copyright laws that were drafted by its own citizens. Cool!
The NSA can send a drone after any mobile phone, even if its off.
The Google Street View team hauled itself up Mt. Fuji.
A Japanese power company admits that radioactive water is leaking from the Fukushima nuclear power plant that was damaged in a 2011 tsunami.  
Stream Nation is like a Dropbox for storing and sharing videos privately. 
Ubuntu is crowd funding $32 million for a dual-boot smartphone that loads either Android or Ubuntu. Wait, $32 million?
Have a great week!
—M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Daily Fast Feed Roundup

Good morning Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 

  • Stream Nation is like a Dropbox for storing and sharing videos privately. 

Have a great week!

M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

We’re finding some super aggressive colonies that are attaching to plastic very well.

Researchers have discovered microbial communities living on the waste we dump in the ocean.

Their study found 1,000 different types of bacteria on ocean plastic samples, including plants, algae, autotrophs, and predators. They warn that plastic is also serving as a new kind of transportation for potentially harmful bacteria looking to hitch a ride across the ocean. 

Plastics like styrofoam currently take up between 25%-30% of our landfill space, and a single cubic foot of styrofoam has the same energy content as about one and a half liters of gasoline. 

College pals Eben Bayer and Gavin McIntyre established Ecovative, which grows cost-effective alternatives to plastic insulation and packaging. While they were students at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Bayer and McIntyre experimented with mycelium, the network of vegetative filaments in mushrooms, and realized that it could be used to form incredibly strong bonds. Essentially, the substance functions like a glue that you can grow and use to form agricultural byproducts like plant stalks and seed husks into natural alternatives to styrofoam packaging and insulation.