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3 Things That Turned This Photograph Into A Ferguson Icon

Cohen first noticed that the the man in his picture was wearing a shirt with an American flag down its front. It was too late to make the Post-Dispatch’s print edition the next day, but Lynden Steele, the Post-Dispatch’s director of photography, tweeted it out at 12:49 AM, Missouri time: “Wow… A man picks up burning tear gas can and throws it back at police,” Steele wrote. “And kept his chips,” another user noted three minutes later.

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3 Things That Turned This Photograph Into A Ferguson Icon

Cohen first noticed that the the man in his picture was wearing a shirt with an American flag down its front. It was too late to make the Post-Dispatch’s print edition the next day, but Lynden Steele, the Post-Dispatch’s director of photography, tweeted it out at 12:49 AM, Missouri time: “Wow… A man picks up burning tear gas can and throws it back at police,” Steele wrote. “And kept his chips,” another user noted three minutes later.

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As Stephen Colbert or any great satirist will tell you, a key to satire is to always stay in character. In The Onion’s case, that “character” is an absurd, alternative world invented to comment on the real one. Every aspect of the fake world has to ring true for the trick to work. That includes the visuals. When nothing you publish is real, every single image has to be made from scratch. “We want to make sure that we’re making our Onion-world fully realized and very real,” says Ben Berkley, managing editor of The Onion. It’s all in service of the joke.
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As Stephen Colbert or any great satirist will tell you, a key to satire is to always stay in character. In The Onion’s case, that “character” is an absurd, alternative world invented to comment on the real one. Every aspect of the fake world has to ring true for the trick to work. That includes the visuals. When nothing you publish is real, every single image has to be made from scratch. “We want to make sure that we’re making our Onion-world fully realized and very real,” says Ben Berkley, managing editor of The Onion. It’s all in service of the joke.

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If you condense the images of the Internet, you get an orange smear. But nobody is sure why.
Today, Jim Bumgardner is the director of application development at Disney Interactive Labs. But almost 10 years ago, he stumbled across a puzzle that would confound him. When layering hundreds of Flickr photos, he found that, again and again, the images became a consistent, bronze blur. He named his montages Bronze Shields. They looked like pizza shells.
To this date, neither Bumgardner nor anyone else has proven why the images of the Internet, when layered and averaged together en masse, round down into a tarnished orange glow Bumgardner dubbed “emergent orange.” But Bumgardner, collecting ideas from researchers and peers across the web, has suggested four theories:
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If you condense the images of the Internet, you get an orange smear. But nobody is sure why.

Today, Jim Bumgardner is the director of application development at Disney Interactive Labs. But almost 10 years ago, he stumbled across a puzzle that would confound him. When layering hundreds of Flickr photos, he found that, again and again, the images became a consistent, bronze blur. He named his montages Bronze Shields. They looked like pizza shells.

To this date, neither Bumgardner nor anyone else has proven why the images of the Internet, when layered and averaged together en masse, round down into a tarnished orange glow Bumgardner dubbed “emergent orange.” But Bumgardner, collecting ideas from researchers and peers across the web, has suggested four theories:

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