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With Nest scooped up by Google for $3.2 billion, one company believes there’s room for another sleek smart thermostat.
Spark wanted to show it could create an open-source Nest-like thermostat using Spark Core, its Arduino-compatible development platform for building Internet-connected hardware. The result isn’t an exact duplicate, but it’s not a bad approximation for a day’s worth of work. For example, instead of a glass and aluminum enclosure, which Nest uses, Spark opted for acrylic and wood for its prototype. 
An open-source, Nest-like thermostat, built in one day

With Nest scooped up by Google for $3.2 billion, one company believes there’s room for another sleek smart thermostat.

Spark wanted to show it could create an open-source Nest-like thermostat using Spark Core, its Arduino-compatible development platform for building Internet-connected hardware. The result isn’t an exact duplicate, but it’s not a bad approximation for a day’s worth of work. For example, instead of a glass and aluminum enclosure, which Nest uses, Spark opted for acrylic and wood for its prototype. 

An open-source, Nest-like thermostat, built in one day

GE Offering Thousands Of Its Patents In Exchange For Innovation

General Electric, the inventor of inventing, is reinventing inventing.

The company is teaming up with a crowdsourced social platform Quirky to release thousands of its patents to the public, starting next month with a few hundred searchable patents.
"People will be able to use GE’s technology in the creation of their own consumer product ideas," the companies explained.
The move by GE follows in the footsteps of companies like Google, who recently contributed 10 patents to allow developers use. The Open Patent Non-Assertion (OPN) Pledge not only offers open source software, but also cuts down on the chances of lawsuits.
Here’s the story.

GE Offering Thousands Of Its Patents In Exchange For Innovation

General Electric, the inventor of inventing, is reinventing inventing.

The company is teaming up with a crowdsourced social platform Quirky to release thousands of its patents to the public, starting next month with a few hundred searchable patents.

"People will be able to use GE’s technology in the creation of their own consumer product ideas," the companies explained.

The move by GE follows in the footsteps of companies like Google, who recently contributed 10 patents to allow developers use. The Open Patent Non-Assertion (OPN) Pledge not only offers open source software, but also cuts down on the chances of lawsuits.

Here’s the story.

The War Over Obama’s Election Tech
The Democratic National Committee (DNC) wants to keep the technology behind Obama’s impressive web presence a secret. 
Obama’s website is a beautiful fundraising machine that is being credited for much of his success during the last election. The social media laden site has given him a reputation of being America’s first truly social president. 
For both ethical and developmental reasons the team of tech superstars that built and managed the site are calling for the programming, which was developed off of pre-existing open source software, to be made public.
Should other people be able to build off of the technology that helped Obama get elected or should it be kept under wraps?
[Image by Wikimedia user TonyTheTiger][Posted by M. Cecelia Bittner]

The War Over Obama’s Election Tech

The Democratic National Committee (DNC) wants to keep the technology behind Obama’s impressive web presence a secret. 

Obama’s website is a beautiful fundraising machine that is being credited for much of his success during the last election. The social media laden site has given him a reputation of being America’s first truly social president. 

For both ethical and developmental reasons the team of tech superstars that built and managed the site are calling for the programming, which was developed off of pre-existing open source software, to be made public.

Should other people be able to build off of the technology that helped Obama get elected or should it be kept under wraps?

[Image by Wikimedia user TonyTheTiger][Posted by M. Cecelia Bittner]

We all know by now that Facebook doesn’t believe in privacy.

This is why yesterday the company published the blueprints  and specs of a new super-efficient system it’s developed—out in the  open, for all to use as they please. It’s part of what Facebook is  calling the Open Compute Project, which is taking a page from the open-source movement in software. Will Facebook’s Open Compute Project Accelerate Data Center Innovation?

We all know by now that Facebook doesn’t believe in privacy.

This is why yesterday the company published the blueprints and specs of a new super-efficient system it’s developed—out in the open, for all to use as they please. It’s part of what Facebook is calling the Open Compute Project, which is taking a page from the open-source movement in software. Will Facebook’s Open Compute Project Accelerate Data Center Innovation?