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We’re finding some super aggressive colonies that are attaching to plastic very well.

Researchers have discovered microbial communities living on the waste we dump in the ocean.

Their study found 1,000 different types of bacteria on ocean plastic samples, including plants, algae, autotrophs, and predators. They warn that plastic is also serving as a new kind of transportation for potentially harmful bacteria looking to hitch a ride across the ocean. 

It’s no secret that the world’s ocean trash problem is getting bad; looking at a handful of images from the Texas-sized Pacific garbage patch should be enough to convince anyone. As for all of our litter that doesn’t end up in the middle of the ocean? It often stays close to shore, where volunteers for Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup pick some of it up, cataloging all the items they find. 
The 10 types of trash that are littering our beaches

It’s no secret that the world’s ocean trash problem is getting bad; looking at a handful of images from the Texas-sized Pacific garbage patch should be enough to convince anyone. As for all of our litter that doesn’t end up in the middle of the ocean? It often stays close to shore, where volunteers for Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup pick some of it up, cataloging all the items they find. 

The 10 types of trash that are littering our beaches

Search For New Antibiotics Goes To The Bottom Of Oceans
The $12 million project, undertaken by Aberdeen University, is launched to find a new generation of infection-busting substances among seabeds.

With infections becoming ever more resistant to drugs, scientists are turning to the deep sea in the hope of finding the next generation of antibiotics. 

[Image by Flickr user NOAA Library]

Search For New Antibiotics Goes To The Bottom Of Oceans

The $12 million project, undertaken by Aberdeen University, is launched to find a new generation of infection-busting substances among seabeds.

With infections becoming ever more resistant to drugsscientists are turning to the deep sea in the hope of finding the next generation of antibiotics. 

[Image by Flickr user NOAA Library]