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How To Maintain Motivation When Your Goals Are Epic
Companies like Box, TaskRabbit, NASA, and The Huffington Post have such huge missions that there’s no easy way at all to put it on a to-do list. So how do founders and leaders at these places stay motivated? Read on for advice from Aaron Levie, Leah Busque, Arianna Huffington, and more.

While luck may play a small role in the success of Silicon Valley and Silicon Alley’s most famed entrepreneurs, it is their unique mindsets that provide the energy, inspiration, and drive needed to achieve what others simply see as unattainable.
So, what distinguishes these entrepreneurs from the rest of us? The seven tech leaders below shared their personal stories on how they think, live, and work in order to survive the grueling hours, overcome the challenges that others have found insurmountable, and achieve what others have failed to do.

Here’s the story.
[Image: Flickr user Tim Simpson]
 

How To Maintain Motivation When Your Goals Are Epic

Companies like Box, TaskRabbit, NASA, and The Huffington Post have such huge missions that there’s no easy way at all to put it on a to-do list. So how do founders and leaders at these places stay motivated? Read on for advice from Aaron Levie, Leah Busque, Arianna Huffington, and more.

While luck may play a small role in the success of Silicon Valley and Silicon Alley’s most famed entrepreneurs, it is their unique mindsets that provide the energy, inspiration, and drive needed to achieve what others simply see as unattainable.

So, what distinguishes these entrepreneurs from the rest of us? The seven tech leaders below shared their personal stories on how they think, live, and work in order to survive the grueling hours, overcome the challenges that others have found insurmountable, and achieve what others have failed to do.

Here’s the story.

[Image: Flickr user Tim Simpson]

 

fastcodesign:

Test subject wearing the pressurized “space” suit for the Reduced Gravity Walking Simulator located at the Lunar Landing Facility. The purpose of this simulator was to study the subject while walking, jumping or running.

fastcodesign:

Test subject wearing the pressurized “space” suit for the Reduced Gravity Walking Simulator located at the Lunar Landing Facility. The purpose of this simulator was to study the subject while walking, jumping or running.

(via fastcodesign)

fastcodesign:

The Dark Side Of The Moon
Russia’s Luna 3 spacecraft returned the first views ever of the far side of the Moon. The first image was taken at 03:30 UT on 7 October at a distance of 63,500 km after Luna 3 had passed the Moon and looked back at the sunlit far side. The last image was taken 40 minutes later from 66,700 km. A total of 29 photographs were taken, covering 70% of the far side. The photographs were very noisy and of low resolution, but many features could be recognized. This is the first image returned by Luna 3.

fastcodesign:

The Dark Side Of The Moon

Russia’s Luna 3 spacecraft returned the first views ever of the far side of the Moon. The first image was taken at 03:30 UT on 7 October at a distance of 63,500 km after Luna 3 had passed the Moon and looked back at the sunlit far side. The last image was taken 40 minutes later from 66,700 km. A total of 29 photographs were taken, covering 70% of the far side. The photographs were very noisy and of low resolution, but many features could be recognized. This is the first image returned by Luna 3.

(via fastcodesign)

The deputy chief scientist from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory consulted on the movie Prometheus, in case you didn’t already have a reason to go see this film.

Opening June 8 in the U.S., the prequel to Scott’s 1979 Alien chronicles an ill-fated exploration team that travels to a distant planet in search of humankind’s origin. To ground the plot in scientific plausibility, Scott turned to Kevin Hand, JPL’s deputy chief scientist for solar system exploration, to explain the kind of terrain, atmosphere, or ecosystem astronauts might encounter on a planet outside of our solar system.
“I met with Ridley and his creative team early in the process to see how science could be utilized in plotlines,” says Hand. “They had lots of questions about what it takes for humans to travel to distant worlds, how those worlds might be uninhabitable for humans, the constraints to consider when thinking about alien life, and how it might have adapted to that environment. It became a creative brainstorming session where we bounced ideas and questions off one another. My goal was to help them get the science right while maintaining a plot that tells a compelling story.”

HOW PROMETHEUS GOT ITS ATMOSPHERE

The deputy chief scientist from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory consulted on the movie Prometheus, in case you didn’t already have a reason to go see this film.

Opening June 8 in the U.S., the prequel to Scott’s 1979 Alien chronicles an ill-fated exploration team that travels to a distant planet in search of humankind’s origin. To ground the plot in scientific plausibility, Scott turned to Kevin Hand, JPL’s deputy chief scientist for solar system exploration, to explain the kind of terrain, atmosphere, or ecosystem astronauts might encounter on a planet outside of our solar system.

“I met with Ridley and his creative team early in the process to see how science could be utilized in plotlines,” says Hand. “They had lots of questions about what it takes for humans to travel to distant worlds, how those worlds might be uninhabitable for humans, the constraints to consider when thinking about alien life, and how it might have adapted to that environment. It became a creative brainstorming session where we bounced ideas and questions off one another. My goal was to help them get the science right while maintaining a plot that tells a compelling story.”

HOW PROMETHEUS GOT ITS ATMOSPHERE

These NASA concept drawings are a big part of why I’m a sci-fi geek today.

The concepts look like America’s post-WWII suburban settlements popped LSD, as if every manicured bush is humming the national anthem while it soars through the galaxy on a psychedelic rainbow. Today, we’re convincing millionaires to book a glorified bus trip into the closest edge of space. In the 1970s, the same efforts could have leased them a two-bed, two-bath condo in the stars, complete with integrated Hi-Fi.

See all the images->

This video is mesmerizing.

usagov:

Aurora Borealis over Northern North America and Canada

Video description:

This video was taken by the crew of Expedition 30 on board the International Space Station on January 29, 2012. This video begins as the space station is passing over the dark waters of the North Pacific Ocean northeast towards Vancouver Island. The Aurora Borealis can be seen far north, where both the under side and top of the aurora are visible. They continue to pass over Canada until the sun begins to come up in the east while over Quebec.

Video from NASA

Mars Science Laboratory “Curiosity Rover” Mission Animation

For seven years, the scientists building NASA’s next-generation Mars rover have been refining every last detail aboard, in order to service one single goal: Searching for signs of life on Mars.

The result of that effort, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity, is getting its final tweaks in a pristine room, almost totally dust and microbe-free, at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA. It ships to the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida in June, in preparation for a late fall launch and nine-month interplanetary journey. NASA will choose the final landing site this summer.

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