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Chinese artist Ai WeiWei has created his first music video, for his single called “Dumbass.” The video recreates the environment of his 2011 prison stay right down to the wallpaper.
Weiwei sees “Dumbass” as a kind of therapy, and an activist message all by itself—it contains criticism of Chinese intellectuals who are trying to change China from within the system.
Watch. 

Chinese artist Ai WeiWei has created his first music video, for his single called “Dumbass.” The video recreates the environment of his 2011 prison stay right down to the wallpaper.

Weiwei sees “Dumbass” as a kind of therapy, and an activist message all by itself—it contains criticism of Chinese intellectuals who are trying to change China from within the system.

Watch

Back in the ’90s, when the Walkman and CDs reigned, the industry combined basic sales data from the Billboard charts with two primary methods of song research: “Call Outs,” where stations played song hooks over the phone and record their responses; and “Auditorium” research, where a group of people react to song hooks as they are played live. In a pre-Internet age, it was about the best you could do.

And now, in 2013, an age of social networks, big data, and smartphones, surely terrestrial radio has developed a more nuanced methodology to find out what songs people really want to hear, right?

Not so much.

A Band Visualizes Fans Sharing Its Music
Sharing music online is a social activity that can quickly escape the bounds of real-world connection. After a few degrees of separation occur—say, after an MP3 passes beyond your sister’s co-worker’s boyfriend’s friend—it’s impossible to know where it might eventually end up. The Beginnings And Endings Project, a web app designed by the Australian band Brightly, visualizes the journey of their first single as it’s shared across the web.
Find out how they did it here.

A Band Visualizes Fans Sharing Its Music

Sharing music online is a social activity that can quickly escape the bounds of real-world connection. After a few degrees of separation occur—say, after an MP3 passes beyond your sister’s co-worker’s boyfriend’s friend—it’s impossible to know where it might eventually end up. The Beginnings And Endings Project, a web app designed by the Australian band Brightly, visualizes the journey of their first single as it’s shared across the web.

Find out how they did it here.

fastcodesign:

“I love this resurgence of the GIF that’s going on right now. I think it’s amazing to see what you can come up with when you are forced to be creative in a restrictive environment. This is true for all creative endeavors: If you remove some of the tools that are available to you, it forces you to be extra creative with the tools that remain.”

Great moments in 8-bit GIF history.

(via fastcodesign)