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"Millions of Americans pay outrageous fees to check cashers, payday lenders, and other predatory businesses—just for the right to use their own money," said T-Mobile CEO John Legere in a press release. “Mobile Money shifts the balance of power for T-Mobile customers and keeps more money in their pockets.

T-Mobile is getting into the banking business

For people in the world without access to traditional banks, these maps of where they can get financial services could be hugely important.

For people in the world without access to traditional banks, these maps of where they can get financial services could be hugely important.

(Source: fastcoexist.com)

People think this stock is Twitter

It is not. 

Tweeter Home Entertainment (TWTRQ) was a consumer electronics retailer that sold TVs, car radios, home theater systems, and the like at more than 100 U.S. stores. In 2007 it filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and had its assets sold to a new owner, who also filed for Chapter 11 a year later.

So why did shares of Tweeter stock jump more than 1500% this morning?

Innovation expert Kaihan Krippendorff uses hip-hop star Drake’s path to achieving his goal of $25 million by the age of 25 to demonstrate his 30-minute strategy for reaching your goals.
1. After you are goneThis is an outcome you will not achieve in your lifetime but it is the reason you get up and push ahead every day.Drake Example: To make genre-cracking music that connects emotionally with his audience.
2. The endThis is a picture (or vision) of what you will achieve or what you will become in the long-term, usually 3 to 10 years from now. Define 1 to 3 metrics, and their values, that will tell you that you have achieved your long-term vision. Drake Example: To be known by Dec. 31, 2016, as one of the greatest musical artists in the world; to be indefinable, with music that crosses genres; to have multiple houses and a private jet.
3. The next chapter (12-18 months)What must you achieve in the next 12 to 18 months to know you are on the path and by what metrics will you judge that the plot is unfolding as you desire?Drake Example: To have released by Dec. 31, 2014, one of the biggest albums of the year.
4. Plot actions (12-18 months)What 3 to 5 actions (or strategic priorities) will you focus on continuously for the next 12 to 18 months to reach this chapter’s conclusion?Drake Example: Release best album yet; continue improving music and performance; launch successful tour.
5. The first scene (the next 3 months)What 1 to 5 key metrics will you focus on in the next three months (and who is responsible)?Drake Example: 15 songs recorded that he thinks are awesome; 120 total hours practiced.



[Drake Image: AP Images]

Innovation expert Kaihan Krippendorff uses hip-hop star Drake’s path to achieving his goal of $25 million by the age of 25 to demonstrate his 30-minute strategy for reaching your goals.

1. After you are gone
This is an outcome you will not achieve in your lifetime but it is the reason you get up and push ahead every day.
Drake Example: To make genre-cracking music that connects emotionally with his audience.

2. The end
This is a picture (or vision) of what you will achieve or what you will become in the long-term, usually 3 to 10 years from now. Define 1 to 3 metrics, and their values, that will tell you that you have achieved your long-term vision. 
Drake Example: To be known by Dec. 31, 2016, as one of the greatest musical artists in the world; to be indefinable, with music that crosses genres; to have multiple houses and a private jet.

3. The next chapter (12-18 months)
What must you achieve in the next 12 to 18 months to know you are on the path and by what metrics will you judge that the plot is unfolding as you desire?
Drake Example: To have released by Dec. 31, 2014, one of the biggest albums of the year.

4. Plot actions (12-18 months)
What 3 to 5 actions (or strategic priorities) will you focus on continuously for the next 12 to 18 months to reach this chapter’s conclusion?
Drake Example: Release best album yet; continue improving music and performance; launch successful tour.

5. The first scene (the next 3 months)
What 1 to 5 key metrics will you focus on in the next three months (and who is responsible)?
Drake Example: 15 songs recorded that he thinks are awesome; 120 total hours practiced.

[Drake Image: AP Images]


 ”I see the future but I live for the moment, make sense don’t it. Now make dollars, I mean billions. I’m a genius, I mean brilliant.”

—Pitbull, who is worth a mere $9.5 million.
This Businessweek infographic lays out the claimed vs. actual networth of rappers because apparently, when rappers rap about how much money they have, sometimes it’s slightly exaggerated. 
 

 ”I see the future but I live for the moment, make sense don’t it. Now make dollars, I mean billions. I’m a genius, I mean brilliant.

—Pitbull, who is worth a mere $9.5 million.

This Businessweek infographic lays out the claimed vs. actual networth of rappers because apparently, when rappers rap about how much money they have, sometimes it’s slightly exaggerated. 

 

On July 9, a Walmart representative told the Washington Post, that the retail giant would not pursue three planned D.C. stores if the city council’s living wage legislation—which would require major retailers to pay workers at least $12.50 per hour, instead of the current $8.25—passed. 
At the center of Walmart’s case are arguments that have been made pretty much any time any city tries to raise the wage standard for its workers: that higher wages are anti-business and negatively impact consumers. 
But really, much of Walmart’s historical fight against fair pay has been debunked. 
Like the myth that higher wages means fewer jobs.
"Part of the reason why higher wages don’t mean fewer jobs," says employment analyst Jack Temple, "is because higher wages offset high turnover." When you pay people more, they tend to stick around, and that gets rid of costs in new hires and absenteeism.
Here are 3 more bogus claims about why Walmart can’t pay a living wage.

On July 9, a Walmart representative told the Washington Post, that the retail giant would not pursue three planned D.C. stores if the city council’s living wage legislation—which would require major retailers to pay workers at least $12.50 per hour, instead of the current $8.25—passed. 

At the center of Walmart’s case are arguments that have been made pretty much any time any city tries to raise the wage standard for its workers: that higher wages are anti-business and negatively impact consumers.

But really, much of Walmart’s historical fight against fair pay has been debunked. 

Like the myth that higher wages means fewer jobs.

"Part of the reason why higher wages don’t mean fewer jobs," says employment analyst Jack Temple, "is because higher wages offset high turnover." When you pay people more, they tend to stick around, and that gets rid of costs in new hires and absenteeism.

Here are 3 more bogus claims about why Walmart can’t pay a living wage.

CEOs earned 273 times the average worker in 2012—and that’s going up
According to the Economic Policy Institute, in 2012, average CEO compensation among the 350 largest U.S. public companies was $14.1 million (including income from options), which was a 12.7% increase on 2011, and 37.4% jump over 2009.
Some economists explain this higher-than-the-highest phenomenon by saying that CEOs’ jobs are becoming more difficult, and that they therefore should be paid better. But the EPI favors a different explanation: that CEOs hold the reins of their organizations and can win the compensation that suits them. 
[Image: Lildevil4ever]

CEOs earned 273 times the average worker in 2012—and that’s going up

According to the Economic Policy Institute, in 2012, average CEO compensation among the 350 largest U.S. public companies was $14.1 million (including income from options), which was a 12.7% increase on 2011, and 37.4% jump over 2009.

Some economists explain this higher-than-the-highest phenomenon by saying that CEOs’ jobs are becoming more difficult, and that they therefore should be paid better. But the EPI favors a different explanation: that CEOs hold the reins of their organizations and can win the compensation that suits them. 

[Image: Lildevil4ever]