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Don Mattrick is leaving Microsoft for Zynga. Mattrick’s latest creation, Xbox One, offers a personalized program screen, as well as the ability to let users Skype with friends while watching TV and get live stats from their fantasy football team during NFL broadcasts. Users can switch seamlessly between gaming and web surfing, and in perhaps the purest expression of this marriage of gaming, tech, and entertainment pop, Mattrick’s pal Spielberg has signed on to produce a TV series based on the Halo video-game franchise, exclusively for the Xbox One.

When he was a teenager growing up in a suburb outside of Vancouver, he was turned down for a job at retail PC chain ComputerLand. So he started showing up at the store, working for, learning about software, and studying what clicked with shoppers. “It was really interesting to watch people walk by and see what they wanted and actually touched,” Mattrick says.

Meet Former Xbox Boss Don Mattrick, Who Just Left Microsoft To Turn Around Zynga
Daily Fast Feed Roundup
Happy Monday! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 
Now you can use Google Street View to see the view from the top of the world’s highest building, the Burj Khalifa tower in Dubai. 
Former South African president Nelson Mandela is still in critical condition with a lung infection, says President Zuma.
From our NSA secret surveillance tracker: Whistleblower Edward Snowden was expected to take a plane to Havana today, but at the time of takeoff, he was nowhere to be found. 
Australian lawmakers hold off on plans to track and store phone call and email data after NSA surveillance scandal raises privacy concerns worldwide. 
Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer has its top managers squirming with his plan to restructure the company.
Facebook is working on its own news reader. Watch out for our Google Reader replacement roundup later today.
The FTC is investigating Google’s purchase of the Israeli social navigation firm Waze after consumer groups and tech experts raise concerns.
Have a great week! —M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Daily Fast Feed Roundup

Happy Monday! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 


Have a great week! —M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

The annual Electronic Entertainment Expo, or E3, begins today in Los Angeles. 
E3 is the gaming industry’s biggest event of the year, when game developers, hardware makers, and enthusiasts alike converge on LA for the weeklong conference. 
Today’s opening briefings include presentations from Microsoft, Electronic Arts, Ubisoft, and Sony.
Fast Company has everything you need to stay on top of E3’s happenings. 

The annual Electronic Entertainment Expo, or E3, begins today in Los Angeles.

E3 is the gaming industry’s biggest event of the year, when game developers, hardware makers, and enthusiasts alike converge on LA for the weeklong conference.

Today’s opening briefings include presentations from Microsoft, Electronic Arts, Ubisoft, and Sony.

Fast Company has everything you need to stay on top of E3’s happenings. 

Microsoft is expected to unveil a new logo today. Over the past 26 years, the Microsoft logo has undergone roughly eight redesigns, but they’ve never deviated from the four-paned window. When the company introduced its new, simplified logo this spring, they positioned it as a radical departure from tradition—new font, new imagery, new color. In reality, says Kim, “the new logo is radical, but does not shed the past.” Furthermore, what works on a Microsoft Office box doesn’t necessarily work for the brand’s rapidly expanding line of products, like XBox and Surface. “Microsoft is showing a progressive vision that was missing in the company for years,” says Kim, and their logo should reflect that progressivity. By clinging to the past, Microsoft is projecting a muddled picture of its new direction.

A Student’s Smart Microsoft Rebranding Is Better Than The Real Thing

The New York Police Department and Microsoft have devised a terrorism detection system that will also generate profit for the city.

Although DAS is officially being touted as an anti-terrorism solution, it will also give the NYPD access to technologies that—depending on the individual’s perspectives—veer on science fiction or Big Brother to combat street crime. The City of New York and Microsoft will be licensing DAS out to other cities; according to Mayor Michael Bloomberg, New York City’s government will take a 30% cut of any profits. “Citizens do not like higher taxes, so we will (find other revenue outlets),” said Bloomberg. Bloomberg continued that “I hope Microsoft sells a lot of copies of this system, because 30% of the profits will go to us.”

NYPD, Microsoft Launch All-Seeing “Domain Awareness System” With Real-Time CCTV, License Plate Monitoring

The New York Police Department and Microsoft have devised a terrorism detection system that will also generate profit for the city.

Although DAS is officially being touted as an anti-terrorism solution, it will also give the NYPD access to technologies that—depending on the individual’s perspectives—veer on science fiction or Big Brother to combat street crime. The City of New York and Microsoft will be licensing DAS out to other cities; according to Mayor Michael Bloomberg, New York City’s government will take a 30% cut of any profits. “Citizens do not like higher taxes, so we will (find other revenue outlets),” said Bloomberg. Bloomberg continued that “I hope Microsoft sells a lot of copies of this system, because 30% of the profits will go to us.”

NYPD, Microsoft Launch All-Seeing “Domain Awareness System” With Real-Time CCTV, License Plate Monitoring

Windows 8, the most radical redesign of Microsoft’s flagship operating system, is often said to be schizophrenic. On the one hand, the user interface that first greets users is beautiful: a fun, playful grid of colorful tiles, based on Microsoft’s well-received Metro design language, that offers access to apps and content. On the other hand, hidden beneath this Metro-enhanced surface is the same desktop-based UI we’ve known for decades, still riddled with taskbars, toolbars, and drop-down menus.

Today, Microsoft unveiled a preview of its latest version of Office, and like Windows 8, the newest iterations of Word, Excel, and PowerPoint are just as split-minded. With roughly one billion users worldwide, Microsoft faced the same issues designing Office as it did Windows: How do you re-imagine a ubiquitous piece of software without alienating your global user base? While Microsoft designed this latest release for mobile, engineering the experience for touch-screen devices, and infusing elements of Metro’s design language into the program, Office 15 still feels slightly dated—bogged down by decades of legacy.

What The New Microsoft Office Gets Wrong

Before Microsoft unveiled the Surface tablet last week in Los Angeles, it unveiled the mouse. More specifically, the 1983 Microsoft Mouse, which CEO Steve Ballmer hailed as an example of the company’s 30-year history in hardware.
That sentiment—that Microsoft is both a software and hardware company—is one the company stressed several months ago in March, when a group of top engineers and designers showed off a different mouse, the Microsoft Arc Touch, a sleek device that can be physically snapped from a flat to folded position. At the Soho House in New York, in front of a small audience of select journalists, members of Microsoft’s Windows 8, Phone, and Xbox teams discussed all aspects of design at Microsoft. But in retrospect, it’s that Arc Touch mouse that not only offered some hint that Microsoft might be interested in playing a larger role outside software, but also gave insight into much of the inspiration behind how the Surface hardware was designed.
How Microsoft’s Arc Touch Mouse Led To Its Elegant Keyboard For Surface

Before Microsoft unveiled the Surface tablet last week in Los Angeles, it unveiled the mouse. More specifically, the 1983 Microsoft Mouse, which CEO Steve Ballmer hailed as an example of the company’s 30-year history in hardware.

That sentiment—that Microsoft is both a software and hardware company—is one the company stressed several months ago in March, when a group of top engineers and designers showed off a different mouse, the Microsoft Arc Touch, a sleek device that can be physically snapped from a flat to folded position. At the Soho House in New York, in front of a small audience of select journalists, members of Microsoft’s Windows 8, Phone, and Xbox teams discussed all aspects of design at Microsoft. But in retrospect, it’s that Arc Touch mouse that not only offered some hint that Microsoft might be interested in playing a larger role outside software, but also gave insight into much of the inspiration behind how the Surface hardware was designed.

How Microsoft’s Arc Touch Mouse Led To Its Elegant Keyboard For Surface

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer unveiled a suite of Microsoft Surface products, including a signature tablet. The 9.3 mm Microsoft Surface tablet, powered by Windows 8, is a hair thinner than the 9.4 mm iPad 3, and its 10.6-inch display has a full inch on the iPad’s. The Surface’s two standout features are a full-sized, multitouch keyboard with trackpad that also doubles as the device’s case, and a built-in kickstand for hands-free use. It also includes a magnetized stylus that uses digital ink and a full-sized USB 2 port.

Watch the video->


The more polarized we become, the stronger we feel a sense of belonging, and the more assured we are of our place in space. Imagine going to a football game and vacillating about which team you support. Chances are the real fans of both teams would shun you. “You’re either with us or against us”—a very useful phrase for momentum building and crowd growing. 

How Enemies Power Innovation

The more polarized we become, the stronger we feel a sense of belonging, and the more assured we are of our place in space. Imagine going to a football game and vacillating about which team you support. Chances are the real fans of both teams would shun you. “You’re either with us or against us”—a very useful phrase for momentum building and crowd growing. 

How Enemies Power Innovation