FastCompany Magazine

The official Tumblr of Fast Company.

fastcodesign:

It’s wild to think of what is going on beneath you. Here is An Unbelievable Glimpse Of The Tunnels In Progress Beneath New York City

The pictures show the current progress of the MTA’s East Side Access project, one which doesn’t actually involve a subway but rather will connect the Long Island Rail Road to Grand Central Terminal for the first time. It’s currently expected to open in 2019. It involves a lot of digging.

(Source: fastcodesign)

Christina Chaey reports: "The MTA’s iconic blue-and-gold MetroCard, wielded daily by 8.5 million New York City public transit riders, is getting a new look, brought to you by retail stores around the city who are turning your transit card into a coupon.

Starting this week, NYC riders will start seeing branded cards featuring coupons or promotions from retail stores.
Gap, for example, is using the MetroCard’s real estate to promote its newly remodeled flagship retail store in Chelsea. It’s also offering MTA riders 20% off through November 18 when they present their Gap-branded MetroCards at any retail location.”

Christina Chaey reports:

"The MTA’s iconic blue-and-gold MetroCard, wielded daily by 8.5 million New York City public transit riders, is getting a new look, brought to you by retail stores around the city who are turning your transit card into a coupon.

Starting this week, NYC riders will start seeing branded cards featuring coupons or promotions from retail stores.

Gap, for example, is using the MetroCard’s real estate to promote its newly remodeled flagship retail store in Chelsea. It’s also offering MTA riders 20% off through November 18 when they present their Gap-branded MetroCards at any retail location.”

artsfortransit:

Here’s an inside look of our newest installation downtown! Hive, a giant LED light installation by Leo Villareal was recently completed at the Bleecker Street Station. The LED sculpture takes the form of an ever-changing colorful honeycomb, dramatically filling an architectural elliptical-shaped space above the stairs that marks the brand new transfer point connecting the IRT (6) and IND (B,D, F, M) subway lines. Hive (Bleecker Street) has a playful aspect in its reference to games. Riders will be able to identify individual elements within a larger context and track this movement. The work explores the compulsion to recognize patterns and the brain’s hard coded desire to understand and make meaning. The patterns also take inspiration from the research of the mathematician John Conway who invented the Game of Life, the best-known cellular automata program. Whether you concentrate on mapping the movement, or just appreciate the colors changing this piece is sure to catch your eye.

Top: Artist Leo Villareal testing his piece before complete, Photo Credit: Rob Wilson

Check out more of Villareal’s bright installations on Co.Design.

(Source: mtaartsdesign, via nycgov)


For more than a decade, the New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority has treated the Atlantic as its very own graveyard, tossing thousands of old subway cars off a barge to rust away on the ocean floor. An environmental crime? Hardly.  The program creates habitats for marine life from Georgia to Jersey and  gives New York’s aging subway cars a vibrant (and free!) retirement  home.
Now, New York photographer Stephen Mallon has captured the MTA’s artificial reef program in a gobstopping  collection of stills that look like what you’d get if you combined an Ed  Burtynsky series with the freeze frames of The Matrix and the train porn of The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (without the agro hostage situation). We’ve got lots of details on the program and a selection of Mallon’s photographs above.

Check out the full slideshow over at Co. Design.

For more than a decade, the New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority has treated the Atlantic as its very own graveyard, tossing thousands of old subway cars off a barge to rust away on the ocean floor. An environmental crime? Hardly. The program creates habitats for marine life from Georgia to Jersey and gives New York’s aging subway cars a vibrant (and free!) retirement home.

Now, New York photographer Stephen Mallon has captured the MTA’s artificial reef program in a gobstopping collection of stills that look like what you’d get if you combined an Ed Burtynsky series with the freeze frames of The Matrix and the train porn of The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (without the agro hostage situation). We’ve got lots of details on the program and a selection of Mallon’s photographs above.

Check out the full slideshow over at Co. Design.