FastCompany Magazine

The official Tumblr of Fast Company.

Communication generally exists through sound or type. But MIT Media Lab developed an insane shapeshifting display that works kind of like Skype for 3-D objects. See it, and more of 2013’s most amazing user interfaces, here!

Communication generally exists through sound or type. But MIT Media Lab developed an insane shapeshifting display that works kind of like Skype for 3-D objects. See it, and more of 2013’s most amazing user interfaces, here!

With 4-D printing, Skylar Tibbits and the Self Assembly Lab are printing materials that fold, transform and shape themselves and could adapt to changing environmental conditions. No assembly required.

With 4-D printing, Skylar Tibbits and the Self Assembly Lab are printing materials that fold, transform and shape themselves and could adapt to changing environmental conditions. No assembly required.

(Source: fastcoexist.com)

We think of 3-D printers as desktop machines, stagnant workhorses used to generate piecemeal shapes for humans to relocate in the real world. But a new, stunning piece of architecture by the Mediated Matter Group at MIT Media Lab brings all of those assumptions into question.

It’s called the Silk Pavilion, and it is what researchers call a “biological swarm approach to 3-D printing.” It is a beautiful structure constructed by 6,500 live silkworms, and may be the most epicly named piece of fabrication technology since the blowtorch. 

Read more here: How MIT Is Hacking Thousands Of Worms To Print Buildings

Pretty on the outside, but as Fast Company wrote in 2008 it’s plagued with problems.

Yes, MIT, the very apogee of tech sophistication, seems to have bought itself a bright-yellow lemon. The showstopper home for its computer-science, linguistics, and philosophy departments cost $300 million to build ($200 million more than initial estimates) and opened in 2004 (four years behind schedule). And now the school has turned to the courts to express its buyer’s remorse. A lawsuit filed in October against both the construction firm and the architect alleges “design and construction failures,” negligence, and breach of contract, which have cost the university $1.5 million in repairs already, with millions more likely to come.

laughingsquid:

Ray and Maria Stata Center at MIT

Pretty on the outside, but as Fast Company wrote in 2008 it’s plagued with problems.

Yes, MIT, the very apogee of tech sophistication, seems to have bought itself a bright-yellow lemon. The showstopper home for its computer-science, linguistics, and philosophy departments cost $300 million to build ($200 million more than initial estimates) and opened in 2004 (four years behind schedule). And now the school has turned to the courts to express its buyer’s remorse. A lawsuit filed in October against both the construction firm and the architect alleges “design and construction failures,” negligence, and breach of contract, which have cost the university $1.5 million in repairs already, with millions more likely to come.

laughingsquid:

Ray and Maria Stata Center at MIT

Scientists at MIT have developed this freaky non-stick coating that keeps ketchup flowing. Amazing solution to an old problem. Also one of the weirdest videos you will see this week.

Read more->

A great video post from the archives: MIT Scientist Captures 90,000 Hours of Video of His Son’s First Words, Graphs It

Cognitive scientist Deb Roy, founder of Bluefin Labs, blew the curve for Flip cam-packing proud pops. Since he and his wife brought their son home from the hospital, Roy has captured his every movement and word with a series of fisheye-lens cameras installed in every room. The purpose was to understand how we learn language.