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Cramming in a mind-melting series of visual allusions, the $3 million WTC logo is also an ad.
The World Trade Center has a new logo. Part of a $3.57 million branding endeavor, it’s a riff on space and negative space, presence, and absence. It’s like a Rubin vase test, playing tricks on the eye and asking viewers to see what they want to see. Which would almost be poetic if not for the fact that it could also be read as an ad for a luxury shopping mall.
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Cramming in a mind-melting series of visual allusions, the $3 million WTC logo is also an ad.

The World Trade Center has a new logo. Part of a $3.57 million branding endeavor, it’s a riff on space and negative space, presence, and absence. It’s like a Rubin vase test, playing tricks on the eye and asking viewers to see what they want to see. Which would almost be poetic if not for the fact that it could also be read as an ad for a luxury shopping mall.

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fastcodesign:

Kids who could identify golden arches and other junk food logos had higher BMIs than their brand-ignorant peers, researchers found.
A new study shows that young children who are familiar with unhealthy food branding—McDonald’s golden arches, Trix’s silly rabbit, Burger King’s crown—are more likely to be overweight than their brand-ignorant peers. Studies show that people who are overweight in childhood tend to stay that way. 

The researchers tested two groups of three- to five-year-olds on their knowledge of fast food and processed food brands like McDonald’s, Burger King, Coke, Pepsi, Fritos, and Doritos. They found that those who could correctly identify the sugar-and-grease-mongering logos tended to have higher body mass indexes (BMIs). “We found the relationship between brand knowledge and BMI to be quite robust,” said Anna McAlister, an MSU assistant professor of advertising and public relations who was a member of the research team.
Read More>

fastcodesign:

Kids who could identify golden arches and other junk food logos had higher BMIs than their brand-ignorant peers, researchers found.

A new study shows that young children who are familiar with unhealthy food branding—McDonald’s golden arches, Trix’s silly rabbit, Burger King’s crown—are more likely to be overweight than their brand-ignorant peers. Studies show that people who are overweight in childhood tend to stay that way

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The researchers tested two groups of three- to five-year-olds on their knowledge of fast food and processed food brands like McDonald’s, Burger King, Coke, Pepsi, Fritos, and Doritos. They found that those who could correctly identify the sugar-and-grease-mongering logos tended to have higher body mass indexes (BMIs). “We found the relationship between brand knowledge and BMI to be quite robust,” said Anna McAlister, an MSU assistant professor of advertising and public relations who was a member of the research team.

Read More>

PopChartLab has managed to capture the entire history of sneaker design, in one cool infographic.

It’s interesting to see what has and has not changed over time, or as Mark Wilson put it, “sneakers have run on a sort of quarantined evolutionary track seemingly independent of the whims of popular fashion.” 

Here’s the full infographic. Got a favorite shoe brand?

You think the London Olympics logo is bad? Pshaw. Check out what Madrid dug out of the ugly bag.

Spaniards mocked the logo swiftly and savagely, with people on Twitter comparing it to everything from flip-flops to bishop mitres. The country’s largest daily newspaper polled readers on how much they liked the new logo. More than 80% said “not at all.”

You think the London Olympics logo is bad? Pshaw. Check out what Madrid dug out of the ugly bag.

Spaniards mocked the logo swiftly and savagely, with people on Twitter comparing it to everything from flip-flops to bishop mitres. The country’s largest daily newspaper polled readers on how much they liked the new logo. More than 80% said “not at all.”

DC Entertainment serves up a sneak peak at the next step in its evolution as a multimedia entertainment company, with a new brand and interactive logo that celebrate its long history of secret identities, superpowers and storytelling.

The new overarching concept embraces the DC Entertainment corporate identity—which comprises publishing, media, and merchandise. That includes the three publishing imprints—DC Comics (superheroes), Vertigo (edgier fare), and Mad Magazine (humor)—plus movies, TV shows, video games, DVDs and merchandising, most of which are distributed by Warner Bros. Thematically, the new look and feel imparts a sense of great storytelling, appeals to all ages, and is flexible across media, digital platforms, and characters.

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