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futurejournalismproject:

Wanted: One Qualified Lebron Stalker
The Northeast Ohio Media Group has a “Lebron James Beat.” Here’s its job listing:

Bring your sports, news and investigative reporting experience to one of the most challenging reporting jobs in the country, covering the sports performance, business dealings and community leadership of basketball star LeBron James. You’ll cover all aspects of his roles in Northeast Ohio and nationally as he returns to the Cleveland Cavaliers, writing, creating videos, and posting across multiple platforms including all relevant types of social media. You’ll also participate in broadcasts where you discuss James, working closely with reporters assigned to cover the Cavaliers and the NBA.

Image: Lebron James GIF via cagrialkan.

futurejournalismproject:

Wanted: One Qualified Lebron Stalker

The Northeast Ohio Media Group has a “Lebron James Beat.” Here’s its job listing:

Bring your sports, news and investigative reporting experience to one of the most challenging reporting jobs in the country, covering the sports performance, business dealings and community leadership of basketball star LeBron James. You’ll cover all aspects of his roles in Northeast Ohio and nationally as he returns to the Cleveland Cavaliers, writing, creating videos, and posting across multiple platforms including all relevant types of social media. You’ll also participate in broadcasts where you discuss James, working closely with reporters assigned to cover the Cavaliers and the NBA.

Image: Lebron James GIF via cagrialkan.

The newly announced Air Yeezy II hit store shelves June 9th, and by the 9th, these limited edition kicks will likely be sold out forever.

"A primal, tactile approach to technology runs throughout every element of the Nike Air Yeezy II. Armored animalistic forms imbue the upper. Hand skived anaconda textured leather quarter panels are embellished with a debossed Vac-Tech Nike Swoosh. The molded rear is sculpted with a reptilian inspired spike, while an engineered strap with scaled down spikes was developed to offer a greater sense of symmetry and lock down."

Lebron Imma Let You Finish, But Kanye Has The Greatest Nikes Of All Time

The newly announced Air Yeezy II hit store shelves June 9th, and by the 9th, these limited edition kicks will likely be sold out forever.

"A primal, tactile approach to technology runs throughout every element of the Nike Air Yeezy II. Armored animalistic forms imbue the upper. Hand skived anaconda textured leather quarter panels are embellished with a debossed Vac-Tech Nike Swoosh. The molded rear is sculpted with a reptilian inspired spike, while an engineered strap with scaled down spikes was developed to offer a greater sense of symmetry and lock down."

Lebron Imma Let You Finish, But Kanye Has The Greatest Nikes Of All Time


When the Miami Heat raided the free-agent talent market last summer,  many people declared the franchise unstoppable. So far, it’s proven to  be good, but vulnerable. What’s behind the group’s struggles? A lesson  for us all in teamwork.
LeBron James sits in a courtside seat after practice, icing his right  knee and giving his thumbs a serious workout on his cell phone. Out on  the floor, Dwyane Wade continues launching three-pointers while testing a  pair of tinted sunglasses under Madison Square Garden’s bright lights.  The swishes — one after another, from somewhere approaching New Jersey  — rouse James from his digital haze. “Whoa!” he says, impressed.  “Whoa!”
Chris Bosh, the third member of the Heat’s holy trinity, is home in  Miami, nursing a sprained ankle. If his teammates are troubled, they  don’t let on.

What LeBron James And The Miami Heat Teach Us About Teamwork

When the Miami Heat raided the free-agent talent market last summer, many people declared the franchise unstoppable. So far, it’s proven to be good, but vulnerable. What’s behind the group’s struggles? A lesson for us all in teamwork.

LeBron James sits in a courtside seat after practice, icing his right knee and giving his thumbs a serious workout on his cell phone. Out on the floor, Dwyane Wade continues launching three-pointers while testing a pair of tinted sunglasses under Madison Square Garden’s bright lights. The swishes — one after another, from somewhere approaching New Jersey — rouse James from his digital haze. “Whoa!” he says, impressed. “Whoa!”

Chris Bosh, the third member of the Heat’s holy trinity, is home in Miami, nursing a sprained ankle. If his teammates are troubled, they don’t let on.

What LeBron James And The Miami Heat Teach Us About Teamwork

Super Bowl Ad Stories: “The Remake,” Featuring LeBron James and Dwight Howard
When it comes to the Super Bowl, advertising agencies can spend months  brainstorming the perfect ad. For Euro RSCG Chicago’s chief creative  officer Jason Peterson, who’s produced four spots for the big game, that  means concepting as many as 60 commercial ideas before finding the  right one.
"There are definitely a different set of parameters  for the Super Bowl—expectations are completely different," he says. "If  you don’t create a talked about, cultural hit, then it’s a waste of $3  million."
Peterson says he and his team start with a basic wish list of ideas.  “When we sit down to write Super Bowl commercials, we write down three  things,” he says. “The first one being monkeys; the second being getting  kicked in the nuts; and maybe the third is some outrageous use of the  product, a catchphrase line, or one of those clichés, like putting a  baby in the commercial.”
The ad man is only half-joking. Year and year, commercials are filled  with monkeys, crotch-kicks, and talking babies. Why? Because they work.  (Read: eTrade baby.) These themes have a long history of success, so why not recycle them for contemporary ads?
For Peterson’s spot last year he followed a similar model, using an  archetype that’s worked magic in Super Bowl after Super Bowl: The  Remake.
Taking a classic commercial and refashioning it for a modern audience is  a sure way to find success. After creating an all-time hit with Cindy  Crawford’s 1992 ad, for example, Pepsi reintroduced the ad years later,  playing off nostalgia for the original—with an updated punch-line.
Click through to see original spots and their remakes, including the classic Michael Jordan and Larry Bird McDonald’s spot remake featuring LeBron James and Dwight Howard.
Related: If you like seeing remakes, check out this series by Kirby Ferguson in which he explores the concept of how Everything is a Remix.

Super Bowl Ad Stories: “The Remake,” Featuring LeBron James and Dwight Howard

When it comes to the Super Bowl, advertising agencies can spend months brainstorming the perfect ad. For Euro RSCG Chicago’s chief creative officer Jason Peterson, who’s produced four spots for the big game, that means concepting as many as 60 commercial ideas before finding the right one.

"There are definitely a different set of parameters for the Super Bowl—expectations are completely different," he says. "If you don’t create a talked about, cultural hit, then it’s a waste of $3 million."

Peterson says he and his team start with a basic wish list of ideas. “When we sit down to write Super Bowl commercials, we write down three things,” he says. “The first one being monkeys; the second being getting kicked in the nuts; and maybe the third is some outrageous use of the product, a catchphrase line, or one of those clichés, like putting a baby in the commercial.”

The ad man is only half-joking. Year and year, commercials are filled with monkeys, crotch-kicks, and talking babies. Why? Because they work. (Read: eTrade baby.) These themes have a long history of success, so why not recycle them for contemporary ads?

For Peterson’s spot last year he followed a similar model, using an archetype that’s worked magic in Super Bowl after Super Bowl: The Remake.

Taking a classic commercial and refashioning it for a modern audience is a sure way to find success. After creating an all-time hit with Cindy Crawford’s 1992 ad, for example, Pepsi reintroduced the ad years later, playing off nostalgia for the original—with an updated punch-line.

Click through to see original spots and their remakes, including the classic Michael Jordan and Larry Bird McDonald’s spot remake featuring LeBron James and Dwight Howard.

Related: If you like seeing remakes, check out this series by Kirby Ferguson in which he explores the concept of how Everything is a Remix.