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LEEDIR, a new law-enforcement tech product sponsored by the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, was an hour away from holding their initial press conference on November 1, 2013, when the worst happened: A mass shooting at Los Angeles Airport. Paul Anthony Ciancia, 23, was later taken into custody on charges of killing a TSA officer and injuring four other people.

For Sheriff Lee Baca and telecommunications entrepreneur George D. Crowley, Jr., it was bizarre timing: LEEDIR was designed specifically to help law enforcement sort through video from terrorist attacks, mass disasters, and street crime. As they were gearing up for their press conference, the Sheriff’s Department was putting their product into real-life use. The suspect was quickly apprehended by the FBI, but it was a hell of a day for a product launch. “As we were getting ready to deploy this platform, the suspect was caught,” Crowley said.

A giant defense contractor and a special effects giant have launched a virtual world where players can even feel when they’re shot. 

Participants also feel pain when injured; two muscle stimulators attached to the triceps administer electric shocks when a user is “shot.” Users can continue to play with non-fatal injuries, but head or chest shots immediately remove them from the training exercise. The electric shock is comparable to one encountered in physical therapy, says Raytheon’s Ellen Houlihan.

Sorry, cops only.
Virtual Training World For Law Enforcement Inflicts Real Pain

A giant defense contractor and a special effects giant have launched a virtual world where players can even feel when they’re shot. 

Participants also feel pain when injured; two muscle stimulators attached to the triceps administer electric shocks when a user is “shot.” Users can continue to play with non-fatal injuries, but head or chest shots immediately remove them from the training exercise. The electric shock is comparable to one encountered in physical therapy, says Raytheon’s Ellen Houlihan.

Sorry, cops only.

Virtual Training World For Law Enforcement Inflicts Real Pain