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The wristwatch is dying, right? Nobody even wants a “smartwatch.” 
Wrong: Allerta raised $3 million in less than a week for its iPhone connected Pebble.

"We’ve been working on smartwatches for years—I think they key was iteration. It’s a very personal device, as people wear a watch and it’s constantly in contact with them. You wear it to bed, you wear it when you’re eating and when you’re working." Thus design was absolutely key to Pebble, and Migicovsky complimented his indistrial designer Steve Johns, who "spent a lot of time looking at what people wear on their wrists, and how we could make something that could be customizable, and beautiful and small and sleek."

The wristwatch is dying, right? Nobody even wants a “smartwatch.”

Wrong: Allerta raised $3 million in less than a week for its iPhone connected Pebble.

"We’ve been working on smartwatches for years—I think they key was iteration. It’s a very personal device, as people wear a watch and it’s constantly in contact with them. You wear it to bed, you wear it when you’re eating and when you’re working." Thus design was absolutely key to Pebble, and Migicovsky complimented his indistrial designer Steve Johns, who "spent a lot of time looking at what people wear on their wrists, and how we could make something that could be customizable, and beautiful and small and sleek."

The notoriously reclusive Alan Moore talks with us about Harvey Pekar’s influence, quantum physics, Frank Miller’s rant, why he usually avoids the Internet, and his unprecedented videoconference to raise Kickstarter cash for a Pekar memorial statue.

The notoriously reclusive Alan Moore talks with us about Harvey Pekar’s influence, quantum physics, Frank Miller’s rant, why he usually avoids the Internet, and his unprecedented videoconference to raise Kickstarter cash for a Pekar memorial statue.

Wanted!
kickstarter:

The Grid Kit is the world’s simplest, recyclable robot-building kit — it’s made up of just one sheet of 18” x 24” corrugated cardboard, with a 1” grid laser cut into its surface. It’s able to be cut, folded, propped, shaped, and motorized into anything you want: an alligator, a spaceship, a robot, a tank, a flower, etc. Seriously, there are twelve year old kids building airboats propelled by motorized fans, and one guy even built robotic hands for himself à la Edward. A $15 pledge gets you a standard kit — the rest is up to your imagination!

Wanted!

kickstarter:

The Grid Kit is the world’s simplest, recyclable robot-building kit — it’s made up of just one sheet of 18” x 24” corrugated cardboard, with a 1” grid laser cut into its surface. It’s able to be cut, folded, propped, shaped, and motorized into anything you want: an alligator, a spaceship, a robot, a tank, a flower, etc. Seriously, there are twelve year old kids building airboats propelled by motorized fans, and one guy even built robotic hands for himself à la Edward. A $15 pledge gets you a standard kit — the rest is up to your imagination!