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“I figured Fast Company received many standard resumes that they routinely read through. Then, they probably threw them out. I wanted to make something different, something exciting and colorful, something that showed them how much I admired them and who I really was. I put an infographic on the website mapping out why I was the perfect candidate—showing that I had something to add.
Two and half hours later, I received an email. I had a phone interview a week later. The rest is history. It turns out you can tweet your way to your dream job (or internship).”
How one industrious undergrad got our attention, and landed an internship.

I figured Fast Company received many standard resumes that they routinely read through. Then, they probably threw them out. I wanted to make something different, something exciting and colorful, something that showed them how much I admired them and who I really was. I put an infographic on the website mapping out why I was the perfect candidate—showing that I had something to add.

Two and half hours later, I received an email. I had a phone interview a week later. The rest is history. It turns out you can tweet your way to your dream job (or internship).”

How one industrious undergrad got our attention, and landed an internship.

Focus on the cover letter. It is not uncommon for me to get 100 applications for one spot, so I’m constantly looking for reasons not to advance a candidate to the interview round. Writing a good cover letter is your best shot at getting noticed. If I hate a cover letter, I won’t even look at the résumé.

Resumes tend to blur together after the seven thousandth or so—the cover letter is your best shot at being singular. Here’s how to write a great cover letter. 

On Sunday night, or some other quiet time, glance at your calendar, and set goals for what you’d like to accomplish in your professional and personal life over the next 168 hours. Schedule these high-value activities in. Once Monday morning hits, you’re in a firefight. So figure out how you’ll advance your troops, rather than just hunkering down.

How to make the most out of your weekend
What traits do today’s prominent female leaders share? Let’s take a look:  
Effective role models: A recent CNN opinion piece about how to have more women like Sheryl Sandberg concludes that it is the prominence of such women that inspires others to be like them: “We can create more Sandbergs by surrounding ourselves with confident, outspoken women.” Sandberg herself actively works to encourage others by running a monthly salon with talks by inspirational women. The more role models we have across all industries, the more likely it is that the female leaders of the future will be inspired.
Mentoring—at all levels: If you can identify opportunities and encourage women early on then they will be able to fulfill their potential throughout their careers. Some of the most prominent women had great mentors—and they are often now working as mentors to the next generation themselves.

Confidence: Confidence can mean a world of difference between a woman who is able to live her dreams and one who is not—so often a talented woman is held back through lack of confidence. The former U.K. prime minister Margaret Thatcher was famous for her confidence and iron will—and for her slogan “The lady’s not for turning.” In an article for the MBA@UNC, media pioneer Arianna Huffington cites lack of confidence as “a killer to success for women. In order to advance their careers, women need to be comfortable seeing themselves as qualified leaders and risk takers.”

Keep reading: 7 shared traits that unite women in power

What traits do today’s prominent female leaders share? Let’s take a look:  

  • Effective role models: A recent CNN opinion piece about how to have more women like Sheryl Sandberg concludes that it is the prominence of such women that inspires others to be like them: “We can create more Sandbergs by surrounding ourselves with confident, outspoken women.” Sandberg herself actively works to encourage others by running a monthly salon with talks by inspirational women. The more role models we have across all industries, the more likely it is that the female leaders of the future will be inspired.

  • Mentoring—at all levels: If you can identify opportunities and encourage women early on then they will be able to fulfill their potential throughout their careers. Some of the most prominent women had great mentors—and they are often now working as mentors to the next generation themselves.

  • Confidence: Confidence can mean a world of difference between a woman who is able to live her dreams and one who is not—so often a talented woman is held back through lack of confidence. The former U.K. prime minister Margaret Thatcher was famous for her confidence and iron will—and for her slogan “The lady’s not for turning.” In an article for the MBA@UNC, media pioneer Arianna Huffington cites lack of confidence as “a killer to success for women. In order to advance their careers, women need to be comfortable seeing themselves as qualified leaders and risk takers.”


Keep reading: 
7 shared traits that unite women in power

It seems that interviewers like to have each day’s ratings balance out. When an interviewer sees 3 or 4 good candidates in a row, they become concerned that they are giving too many high ratings. So, if another good candidate comes walking through the door, they get a lower rating just so that the ratings for the day are not uniformly high.

When it comes to job interviews, you should aim to be the first in line

A recent Girls in Tech/Facebook meetup about learning from your career mistakes was full of actionable pieces of advice, particularly on finding and keeping good mentors. Here are some of the best quotes of the night:

On the importance of having mentors:

"Build a network of women. You don’t have to be on your own." -AT&T’s Amanda Stent

"Have a strong network both at work and outside of work. Talking about work issues helps you get through them." -Catherine Hui 

 On choosing your mentors:
"Do your homework in approaching a mentor - don’t ask someone just based on reputation" -Tweeted by @AmyVernon

"If you don’t feel comfortable with your mentor, maybe that person isn’t the right mentor. " -Bloomberg’s Catherine Hui 

On being mentored:

"If you go to therapy, you don’t lie to your shrink. Same philosophy applies to mentors. Be honest with them." - Nikki Stevens (@drnikki)

Who are your mentors? How did you find them? How important is it to you to have a mentor?

(Photos by M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger)

"The job as we understood it is disappearing."
On Friday, May 24, at 2:00 p.m. EST senior writer Anya Kamenetz will be moderating a discussion with Glen Hiemstra, founder of Futurist.com, about how work will evolve over the next several decades both in America and globally.
Join us: Simply follow this link to register with Cisco’s WebEx software now, and then sign in on Friday to take part. Bring any questions you might have.


"The job as we understood it is disappearing."

On Friday, May 24, at 2:00 p.m. EST senior writer Anya Kamenetz will be moderating a discussion with Glen Hiemstra, founder of Futurist.com, about how work will evolve over the next several decades both in America and globally.

Join us: Simply follow this link to register with Cisco’s WebEx software now, and then sign in on Friday to take part. Bring any questions you might have.