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 SoulCycle Founders: You Know Your Business Better Than Your Critics Do 


When Julie Rice and Elizabeth Cutler founded the high-end gym chain SoulCycle, they faced an uphill battle. Their friends, for starters, told the cofounders and CEOs that their emphasis on indoor spinning was a dated idea.

"He said, ‘I don’t have the heart to tell you this, but you know spinning is dead,’" laughs Cutler, recalling the conversation.
But Cutler and Rice felt differently. “We were like ‘Well, I think we can still do it. I think we can still reinvent it,’” she says. “‘I think we can still create something we want as the user.’”

SoulCycle Founders: You Know Your Business Better Than Your Critics Do

When Julie Rice and Elizabeth Cutler founded the high-end gym chain SoulCycle, they faced an uphill battle. Their friends, for starters, told the cofounders and CEOs that their emphasis on indoor spinning was a dated idea.

"He said, ‘I don’t have the heart to tell you this, but you know spinning is dead,’" laughs Cutler, recalling the conversation.

But Cutler and Rice felt differently. “We were like ‘Well, I think we can still do it. I think we can still reinvent it,’” she says. “‘I think we can still create something we want as the user.’”

8. Fail well

There should be no stigma attached to failure. If you do not fail often, you are not trying hard enough. At Google, once a product fails to reach its potential, it is axed, but the company pulls from the best of the features. “Failure is actually a badge of honor,” he says. “Failure is the way to be innovative and successful. You can fail with pride.”

Google Reveals Its 9 Principles of Innovation

In this way we get “brain hubs,” places that contribute an outsized portion of the GDP and generate an unreasonable number of patents. This capital-ization has pretty far-reaching effects: the more high-tech, high-powered folks you have in a place, the more similarly gifted people will be attracted to moving there—and all these jobs actually generate more jobs. Moretti says that a high-tech job actually creates something like 10 service sector gigs.

Why Your Friends Shape Your Happiness, Creativity, and Career

LEADERSHIP IN THE FIELD: MARINES, ARMY, AFGHAN NATIONAL ARMY

E.B. Boyd, embedded reporter in Afghanistan, profiles the leadership transition from the Marines to the Afghan National Army, and the effort and innovation behind it.

LEAD OR DIE 

Lt. Col. Philip Treglia and photographer Teru Kuwayama will be featured speakers at tomorrow’s Innovation Uncensored SF conference. Join us.

This week, the home page of the NYTimes.com featured an unusual, wonderful Op-Doc called “A Short History of the Highrise.” Billed as an “interactive documentary,” the project was a collaboration between the Times and the National Film Board of Canada.

With influences ranging from traditional documentary to video games to the tablet experience, “A Short History of the Highrise” is a digital publishing rabbit hole. A casual viewer can consume the film in a few minutes, while the obsessive can delve deep into supplemental content for hours. Fast Company caught up with the project’s Emmy Award-winning director, Katerina Cizek, to learn more about how the documentary form is being transformed in a digital age.

I literally don’t understand the concept of boring. I know that it’s out there. I know some people complain of boredom. But I have no idea what’s on their mind when they experience it. Are they are desensitized? Are they are too bombarded? Are they incapable of connecting to life? Because—wow!—life is actually pretty good.

Gogol Bordello’s lead singer Eugene Hutz on why only boring people get bored. 

What a punk sensibility can teach you about embracing chaos