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“But how will it play in rural Asia?”

This probably isn’t a phrase Hollywood studio executives are throwing about often. Yet it’s something the folks at Newton Circus, the Singapore-based social enterprise hub, are increasingly asking themselves. Newton Circus is developing a new venture called Mobile Movies, which arranges screenings in towns and villages off the beaten track in Myanmar and Indonesia. By bringing rural populations together and holding their attention, Newton Circus is able to gather data and pitch new products and practices on behalf of NGOs and companies.

Mobile Movies is still in the earliest stages—Newton Circus has only run a handful of prototype trips to rural villages, but has rapidly found them to be successful. Ultimately, here’s how Mobile Movies will work in a typical rural community: Newton Circus will lend one member of the community a movie-screening kit, which includes a Windows 8 smartphone and a mini-projector with speakers. Newton Circus will pay this local field agent roughly $7.75 per day, on average tripling that person’s wages. The field agent visits a different village in the area each day of the week to screen a movie. Advertisements and PSAs may be included with the movie screening, like previews. The field agent may also directly educate the villagers about products and best practices (hygiene, financial literacy), as well as offer product samples. The field agent also can collect data from the villagers (what are the demographics? are there schools or medical facilities?) on the smartphone, delivering this data to companies more quickly than traditional pen-and-paper methods.

Daily Fast Feed Roundup
TGIF! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 
A lead Google Glass developer is working on wearable tech for dogs that would let them communicate more easily with their handlers.
Meet the 6-foot tall humanoid robot that may just save your life someday.
Edward Snowden has requested a meeting with human rights representatives at Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport.
The NSA has been monitoring Skype calls since July of 2012. 
The tin in your iPhone might be wrecking the environment. 
UK researchers are testing a 'penetrator' spacecraft that is designed to search for life on Jupiter's moon. It would travel at about 760 mph, close to the speed of sound.
Today’s most creative person is Alex Maccaw, the creator of Monacle, a place where techies can share ideas and constructive criticism without having to deal with snarky, useless feedback.
Lady Gaga has revealed more details of her upcoming ARTPOP project. The”musical and visual engineering system” is set to launch in November.
Music discovery service Shazam has compiled a list of the top ten most misheard lyrics in pop. And they’re pretty funny.
The Gagnam Style artist Psy has joined the ranks of Justin Beiber and Rihanna with three billion YouTube views. 
Have a good one!
—M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Daily Fast Feed Roundup

TGIF! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 

  • Today’s most creative person is Alex Maccaw, the creator of Monacle, a place where techies can share ideas and constructive criticism without having to deal with snarky, useless feedback.

Have a good one!

M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

How The UN’s New Data Lab In Indonesia Uses Twitter To Preempt Disaster

Predictive disaster relief is the goal, says Robert Kirkpatrick, Director of the UN’s Global Pulse initiative, and Twitter data may be the key. The program uses social network analysis to study living conditions throughout the world and preempt crises. “We found that a combination of food words and mood state was able to predict the consumer price index several weeks ahead,” says Kirkpatrick.

Read the full article from our new section Co.Labs here.

How The UN’s New Data Lab In Indonesia Uses Twitter To Preempt Disaster

Predictive disaster relief is the goal, says Robert Kirkpatrick, Director of the UN’s Global Pulse initiative, and Twitter data may be the key. The program uses social network analysis to study living conditions throughout the world and preempt crises. “We found that a combination of food words and mood state was able to predict the consumer price index several weeks ahead,” says Kirkpatrick.

Read the full article from our new section Co.Labs here.