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This Fake Fast-Food Restaurant Is Actually Serving Money To Homeless People
Finnish artist Jani Leinonen has set up a Hunger King installation in Budapest that draws attention to Hungary’s conflicting policies toward the rich and the poor. Visitors choose between getting in “rich” or “poor” lines, with signage on either side revealing stats about inequality in taxes and education opportunities, fines for vagrancy, and other points. The first 50 people in the “poor” line each day are greeted with a clamshell burger box holding the equivalent of about $15, the daily minimum wage in Budapest. Visitors to the “rich” line get a fake burger and fake fries, and an appeal toward activism.
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This Fake Fast-Food Restaurant Is Actually Serving Money To Homeless People

Finnish artist Jani Leinonen has set up a Hunger King installation in Budapest that draws attention to Hungary’s conflicting policies toward the rich and the poor. Visitors choose between getting in “rich” or “poor” lines, with signage on either side revealing stats about inequality in taxes and education opportunities, fines for vagrancy, and other points. The first 50 people in the “poor” line each day are greeted with a clamshell burger box holding the equivalent of about $15, the daily minimum wage in Budapest. Visitors to the “rich” line get a fake burger and fake fries, and an appeal toward activism.

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When two actor friends waded into the Occupy Wall Street protests while pretending to be obnoxious investment bankers, Brendan Gibbons knew he had the foundation for a humorous and morally ambiguous tale about “the defining issue of our time.”
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When two actor friends waded into the Occupy Wall Street protests while pretending to be obnoxious investment bankers, Brendan Gibbons knew he had the foundation for a humorous and morally ambiguous tale about “the defining issue of our time.”

Read More>

The U.S. Has One Of The Largest Income Inequality Gaps In The Developed World, Does Not Care

You would think people might be concerned when they live in societies with big, ugly, entrenched gaps between rich and poor. But those in the United States generally don’t, according to recent survey data from the Pew Research Center.

Don’t confuse caring with awareness: According to another Pew survey from July of 2012, nearly two-thirds of Americans know that income inequality has grown worse over the last decade. But despite having a measure of income inequality three to four times wider than most developed democracies, only 47% of the population thinks it’s a problem.