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Two Hollywood startups announced a partnership today designed to bring new voices to entertainment. The Black List, a community of unrepresented screenwriters, is partnering with WIGS, the Fox-affiliated YouTube TV network, which has committed to producing a drama pilot by a yet-to-be-chosen Black List writer.
For as long as Hollywood has been Hollywood, it’s been dominated by a clubby atmosphere that sometimes seems designed to frustrate the dreams of new writers. The Black List, founded by Franklin Leonard (one of Fast Company’s Most Creative People in Business 1000), began as a list of high-quality unproduced feature film scripts. Since 2012, though, Leonard has grown the brand into a website for the hosting and evaluation of unproduced screenplays and teleplays, with some users of the site going on to receive professional representation and optioning of their work.

Two Hollywood startups announced a partnership today designed to bring new voices to entertainment. The Black List, a community of unrepresented screenwriters, is partnering with WIGS, the Fox-affiliated YouTube TV network, which has committed to producing a drama pilot by a yet-to-be-chosen Black List writer.

For as long as Hollywood has been Hollywood, it’s been dominated by a clubby atmosphere that sometimes seems designed to frustrate the dreams of new writers. The Black List, founded by Franklin Leonard (one of Fast Company’s Most Creative People in Business 1000), began as a list of high-quality unproduced feature film scripts. Since 2012, though, Leonard has grown the brand into a website for the hosting and evaluation of unproduced screenplays and teleplays, with some users of the site going on to receive professional representation and optioning of their work.

Q: One of your most memorable scenes had Skyler getting up from dinner with Walter, Hank, and Marie and walking into the swimming pool. What was it like for you to shoot that scene? Can you swim?

A: I’m a decent swimmer, thank God, but I never thought I’d be able to do that kind of thing, because it required me having to be trained with scuba equipment, with a regulator. Going under the water and staying under the water for periods of time gives me claustrophobia.

But I also like a good challenge. The boys always got to do a lot of stunts on the show. So when I got to do something that was stuntlike, I thought, okay good. Now I finally get to do something.

It was hard to tell from the shot, but I actually had to walk into the pool, and then there was a cut after I walk down into the water. Our wonderful special effects people and our stunt people had to build a wire cage, and they rigged that blue skirt I was wearing onto the wire cage so that the effect of the skirt billowing around my head was created.

They placed that wire cage in the deep end of the pool. That’s why they had to train me to go underwater and breathe with a regulator.

More: Anna Gunn on the art of playing Walter White’s wife in ‘Breaking Bad’

"I think it validates the model in a lot of ways. I think it also blurs the line forever about what is television. Television is what’s on the screen, no matter what size the screen or how the content got to the screen. Television is television is television." 

—Netflix’s chief content officer Ted Sarandos talks about the Emmy nominations for Netflix shows: House of Cards, Arrested Development, and Hemlock Grove.

Do Netflix’s Emmy nominations blur the line forever about what TV is?

Here are some excerpts from the April issue cover story"Sarah Silverman, Michael Cera, Ben Stiller, And The Rebels Saving Hollywood"
Determined not to repeat the mistakes of the music business, a cadre of digital pioneers is rebooting the entertainment industry.

"These pioneers seem to have learned from the mistakes of the music and newspaper businesses, which have been decimated by technological change. Rather than be reactionary and afraid, the New Hollywood crowd is proactive and creative. They’re rethinking their business and adopting some of the tech world’s culture, attitudes, and practices.  



"While its financial bets are iffy, there’s no question that Hollywood culture is, in fact, changing—and fast. It’s something that’s forced on the industry as the line between digital and traditional content blurs more and more. When you combine web series such as H+, an apocalyptic sci-fi tale produced by X-Men director Bryan Singer; programming likeHouse of Cards and Battleground from Netflix and Hulu, respectively; and all the professional programming on YouTube’s Original Channels, you get a redefinition of what Hollywood content can look like and how it’s made.”

Here is the full story.
And here are a few more stories from our Digital Hollywood series:
The Secret (Tech) Life of Ben Stiller
The Innovators of Hollywood

Here are some excerpts from the April issue cover story"Sarah Silverman, Michael Cera, Ben Stiller, And The Rebels Saving Hollywood"

Determined not to repeat the mistakes of the music business, a cadre of digital pioneers is rebooting the entertainment industry.

"These pioneers seem to have learned from the mistakes of the music and newspaper businesses, which have been decimated by technological change. Rather than be reactionary and afraid, the New Hollywood crowd is proactive and creative. They’re rethinking their business and adopting some of the tech world’s culture, attitudes, and practices.  


"While its financial bets are iffy, there’s no question that Hollywood culture is, in fact, changing—and fast. It’s something that’s forced on the industry as the line between digital and traditional content blurs more and more. When you combine web series such as H+, an apocalyptic sci-fi tale produced by X-Men director Bryan Singer; programming likeHouse of Cards and Battleground from Netflix and Hulu, respectively; and all the professional programming on YouTube’s Original Channels, you get a redefinition of what Hollywood content can look like and how it’s made.”

Here is the full story.

And here are a few more stories from our Digital Hollywood series:



The Golden Globes included everything you could want in an awards show: hilarious bits from Amy Poehler and Tina Fey, insane outfits, celebrities who brought their moms as dates, and Mel Gibson.
It was a reminder, yet again, that the host you choose goes a long way toward defining what sort of product you present.
But perhaps nothing received more attention in the aftermath of last night’s Hollywood bash than Jodie Foster’s rambling, sweet, and headline-making thank you speech…
[Photo by Flickr user  quicheisinsane]

The Golden Globes included everything you could want in an awards show: hilarious bits from Amy Poehler and Tina Fey, insane outfits, celebrities who brought their moms as dates, and Mel Gibson.

It was a reminder, yet again, that the host you choose goes a long way toward defining what sort of product you present.

But perhaps nothing received more attention in the aftermath of last night’s Hollywood bash than Jodie Foster’s rambling, sweet, and headline-making thank you speech…

[Photo by Flickr user quicheisinsane]