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Exposed: A History of Lingerie charts how designers responded to feminist demands for better underwear over 300 years of ill-fitting, freeform, and racy lingerie. 
“Burn up the corsets!” clothing reform activist Elizabeth Stuart Phelps wrote in 1873. “Make a bonfire of the cruel steel that has lorded it over the contents of the abdomen and thorax for so many years and heave a sigh of relief: for your ‘emancipation,’ I assure you, has from this moment begun.”

We have feminism to thank for making our underwear more comfortable, a truth that’s clearly reflected in Exposed: A History of Lingerie, now on view at the Museum at Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT). The more than 70 pieces on view, from the 18th century to today—from girdles to the “no-bra” bras of the ‘60s—track the social and sexual mores of different eras through the lingerie that women wore. The show also reveals how designers (thank goodness) responded in very tactile ways to feminist demands for less oppressive underwear.
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fastcodesign:

Exposed: A History of Lingerie charts how designers responded to feminist demands for better underwear over 300 years of ill-fitting, freeform, and racy lingerie. 

“Burn up the corsets!” clothing reform activist Elizabeth Stuart Phelps wrote in 1873. “Make a bonfire of the cruel steel that has lorded it over the contents of the abdomen and thorax for so many years and heave a sigh of relief: for your ‘emancipation,’ I assure you, has from this moment begun.”

image

We have feminism to thank for making our underwear more comfortable, a truth that’s clearly reflected in Exposed: A History of Lingerie, now on view at the Museum at Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT). The more than 70 pieces on view, from the 18th century to today—from girdles to the “no-bra” bras of the ‘60s—track the social and sexual mores of different eras through the lingerie that women wore. The show also reveals how designers (thank goodness) responded in very tactile ways to feminist demands for less oppressive underwear.

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To honor D-Day’s 70th anniversary on June 6, this visualization splices photos of France and England in 1944 with images taken today.
Over at the Guardian, award-winning Getty Images photographer Peter Macdiarmid lets us peel back layers of history with a haunting then-and-now photo series of D-Day. Its 70th anniversary is upon us: On June 6, 1944, in what would become the largest seaborne military invasion in history, 160,000 Allied troops stormed a 50-mile stretch of coastline in Normandy, France, to fight Nazi Germany.
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To honor D-Day’s 70th anniversary on June 6, this visualization splices photos of France and England in 1944 with images taken today.

Over at the Guardian, award-winning Getty Images photographer Peter Macdiarmid lets us peel back layers of history with a haunting then-and-now photo series of D-Day. Its 70th anniversary is upon us: On June 6, 1944, in what would become the largest seaborne military invasion in history, 160,000 Allied troops stormed a 50-mile stretch of coastline in Normandy, France, to fight Nazi Germany.

See More>

Beautifully Pristine Relics Of Technologies Past

Technology advances rapidly, with our computers and cell phones becoming outdated practically the moment we start using them. Something newer, faster, better is already on sale, making a cell phone from a decade ago look positively alien. There’s a sentimental pull that emanates from the obsolete hunks of electronics that once served as cutting edge visions of the future and Portland-based photographer Jim Golden harnesses that nostalgia in his new photography series “Relics of Technology.”

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World’s Fair 50:

The Automatic Language Translator

Another World’s Fair crowd pleaser was the IBM Automatic Language Translator. In a live demonstration, the computer translated Russian text into English in a matter of seconds.

The most amazing part was that the translation wasn’t created from a computerized ‘dictionary search’ but from the analysis of both languages’ complex nuances and shades of meaning, syntax and grammar. To think that 50 years later, we have smart phones with translation apps for just about every language spoken.  Очень здорово. Translation: Very cool.  

 

Last month, in honor of its eighth birthday, Twitter took a walk down memory lane. The network unveiled a special page, allowing users to automatically see and share their first tweet ever.

As savvy users quickly discovered, the tool also allowed looking up awkward—and occasionally embarrassing—first tweets from anyone, including celebrities, entrepreneurs, and politicians.

It turns out that even some of today’s most prolific and successful tweeters got off to a rocky start. Here’s a peek at five famous first tweets and what they say about Twitter’s evolution:

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pbsthisdayinhistory:

March 27, 1912: The First Japanese Cherry Blossom Trees Are Planted in the U.S.On this day in 1912, the first two Japanese cherry blossom trees were successfully planted by First Lady Helen Taft and Viscountess Chinda on the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C. Japanese Mayor Yukio Ozaki of Tokyo gave the U.S. over 3,000 trees to demonstrate the growing relationship between the U.S. and Japan.Every spring, Washington D.C. commemorates the initial planting through the National Cherry Blossom Festival. This year, the peak bloom is forecast for April 8-12. 
As you wait for this year’s blooming period, treat yourself to this delicious spring recipe, a Raspberry, Pistachio, and Vanilla Semifreddo from PBS Food.Image: Cherry blossoms in Washington D.C. 2013

pbsthisdayinhistory:

March 27, 1912: The First Japanese Cherry Blossom Trees Are Planted in the U.S.

On this day in 1912, the first two Japanese cherry blossom trees were successfully planted by First Lady Helen Taft and Viscountess Chinda on the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C. Japanese Mayor Yukio Ozaki of Tokyo gave the U.S. over 3,000 trees to demonstrate the growing relationship between the U.S. and Japan.

Every spring, Washington D.C. commemorates the initial planting through the National Cherry Blossom Festival. This year, the peak bloom is forecast for April 8-12.

As you wait for this year’s blooming period, treat yourself to this delicious spring recipe, a Raspberry, Pistachio, and Vanilla Semifreddo from PBS Food.

Image: Cherry blossoms in Washington D.C. 2013

Happy 25th Birthday, World Wide Web! Our Gift: An Intentionally Brief History Of You
On March 12, 1989, the visual layer of the Internet was quietly revealed, fundamentally changing the way we communicate, research, consume and share media, waste time at work, and, well, do everything else really. It was called the World Wide Web. To celebrate, we’ve put together a purposefully brisk and oversimplified history (trust us, you don’t want to see the unabridged version) leading up to its now 25 years of existence.
Read> Fast Company

Happy 25th Birthday, World Wide Web! Our Gift: An Intentionally Brief History Of You

On March 12, 1989, the visual layer of the Internet was quietly revealed, fundamentally changing the way we communicate, research, consume and share media, waste time at work, and, well, do everything else really. It was called the World Wide Web. To celebrate, we’ve put together a purposefully brisk and oversimplified history (trust us, you don’t want to see the unabridged version) leading up to its now 25 years of existence.

Read> Fast Company