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Visualized: The Weirdest, Wildest Viruses In Computer History

Founded and curated by Amsterdam-based writer Bas Van de Poel, the Computer Virus Catalog collects the weirdest viruses from the annals of computer history, and visualizes them as art. By pairing a computer virus with a graphic designer, Van de Poel’s project is a wonderful tribute to the history of chaos, computers and code.

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Oh Grrrrrrreatt, 300 Vintage Ad Characters Have Invaded SFO
Those who think modern advertising is lacking the gravitas provided by talking tunas will want to make a nostalgia-soaked stopover at SFO in the next few months. ”A World of Characters,” author and pop culture historian Warren Dotz’s collection of 300 iconic animals, mythical creatures, and anthropomorphic foods, is on display at the San Francisco International Airport through January 4.
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Oh Grrrrrrreatt, 300 Vintage Ad Characters Have Invaded SFO

Those who think modern advertising is lacking the gravitas provided by talking tunas will want to make a nostalgia-soaked stopover at SFO in the next few months. ”A World of Characters,” author and pop culture historian Warren Dotz’s collection of 300 iconic animals, mythical creatures, and anthropomorphic foods, is on display at the San Francisco International Airport through January 4.

Slideshow>

fastcodesign:

Exposed: A History of Lingerie charts how designers responded to feminist demands for better underwear over 300 years of ill-fitting, freeform, and racy lingerie. 
“Burn up the corsets!” clothing reform activist Elizabeth Stuart Phelps wrote in 1873. “Make a bonfire of the cruel steel that has lorded it over the contents of the abdomen and thorax for so many years and heave a sigh of relief: for your ‘emancipation,’ I assure you, has from this moment begun.”

We have feminism to thank for making our underwear more comfortable, a truth that’s clearly reflected in Exposed: A History of Lingerie, now on view at the Museum at Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT). The more than 70 pieces on view, from the 18th century to today—from girdles to the “no-bra” bras of the ‘60s—track the social and sexual mores of different eras through the lingerie that women wore. The show also reveals how designers (thank goodness) responded in very tactile ways to feminist demands for less oppressive underwear.
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fastcodesign:

Exposed: A History of Lingerie charts how designers responded to feminist demands for better underwear over 300 years of ill-fitting, freeform, and racy lingerie. 

“Burn up the corsets!” clothing reform activist Elizabeth Stuart Phelps wrote in 1873. “Make a bonfire of the cruel steel that has lorded it over the contents of the abdomen and thorax for so many years and heave a sigh of relief: for your ‘emancipation,’ I assure you, has from this moment begun.”

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We have feminism to thank for making our underwear more comfortable, a truth that’s clearly reflected in Exposed: A History of Lingerie, now on view at the Museum at Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT). The more than 70 pieces on view, from the 18th century to today—from girdles to the “no-bra” bras of the ‘60s—track the social and sexual mores of different eras through the lingerie that women wore. The show also reveals how designers (thank goodness) responded in very tactile ways to feminist demands for less oppressive underwear.

Read More>

To honor D-Day’s 70th anniversary on June 6, this visualization splices photos of France and England in 1944 with images taken today.
Over at the Guardian, award-winning Getty Images photographer Peter Macdiarmid lets us peel back layers of history with a haunting then-and-now photo series of D-Day. Its 70th anniversary is upon us: On June 6, 1944, in what would become the largest seaborne military invasion in history, 160,000 Allied troops stormed a 50-mile stretch of coastline in Normandy, France, to fight Nazi Germany.
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To honor D-Day’s 70th anniversary on June 6, this visualization splices photos of France and England in 1944 with images taken today.

Over at the Guardian, award-winning Getty Images photographer Peter Macdiarmid lets us peel back layers of history with a haunting then-and-now photo series of D-Day. Its 70th anniversary is upon us: On June 6, 1944, in what would become the largest seaborne military invasion in history, 160,000 Allied troops stormed a 50-mile stretch of coastline in Normandy, France, to fight Nazi Germany.

See More>

Beautifully Pristine Relics Of Technologies Past

Technology advances rapidly, with our computers and cell phones becoming outdated practically the moment we start using them. Something newer, faster, better is already on sale, making a cell phone from a decade ago look positively alien. There’s a sentimental pull that emanates from the obsolete hunks of electronics that once served as cutting edge visions of the future and Portland-based photographer Jim Golden harnesses that nostalgia in his new photography series “Relics of Technology.”

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