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The next wave of fitness trackers will do a lot more than count your steps, mold raw data, and present it all for you in a pretty chart for you to glance at and forget about. If Jawbone Up is any indication, these wearables will use the subtle power of suggestion to help us live healthier lives, too.

Today, Jawbone is rolling out a new, slightly tongue-in-cheek but sleek app to help manage our caffeine intake. It is called Up Coffee.

Its premise is simple enough: You log your coffee, tea, and energy drink consumption in the app, which will tell you where you fall on a spectrum from “Wired” to “Sleep Ready.” If you have a fitness band, it will make correlations, and tell you when it might be wise to stop your intake if you’re hoping to sleep at a reasonable hour that night. “After tracking both caffeine intake and sleep for 10 days, Up Coffee can tell you things like the amount of sleep you lose on average for every 100mg of caffeine you ingest,” the company says.

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"There really are two kinds of food entrepreneurs," says venture capitalist Paul Matteucci, who encourages and connects food-tech upstarts through his not-for-profit, Feeding 10 Billion. “There are the ones that hang around Berkeley or Brooklyn, and build businesses mostly for the end consumer. Then there is a whole different group of highly technical people who are building robotics for the field, sensor-based technology, automated watering systems, new food-packaging technologies, and big-data-related inventory control to reduce waste.” These, he says, are “the people who are going to solve the big problems.”

A raft of entrepreneurs and venture capitalists made their money in tech, and now want to do something with an even longer-lasting impact. Meet the Silicon Valley companies trying to fix our broken food system

By now, we’re all familiar with the idea of wearable health trackers. But we’re used to seeing them on our wrists. If Google gets its way, the next batch of wearables may be worn in your eyes.
The company’s experimental wing, Google[x], announced on Thursday its plan to test a prototype of a smart contact lens that would monitor the sugar levels of diabetes patients, possibly alerting them when glucose levels become dangerously high or low.
Google is making a smart contact lens

By now, we’re all familiar with the idea of wearable health trackers. But we’re used to seeing them on our wrists. If Google gets its way, the next batch of wearables may be worn in your eyes.

The company’s experimental wing, Google[x], announced on Thursday its plan to test a prototype of a smart contact lens that would monitor the sugar levels of diabetes patients, possibly alerting them when glucose levels become dangerously high or low.

Google is making a smart contact lens

This Symptom-Checker App Lets You Keep A Digital Doctor In Your Pocket 


Sharecare, the Atlanta-based digital platform for expert health information, is trying to help consumers take the guesswork out of at-home diagnoses with AskMD, a free, iOS 7-exclusive app out today. The app takes you through a highly personalized, step-by-step consultation that narrows down your possible health conditions to the best possible matches for you.

This Symptom-Checker App Lets You Keep A Digital Doctor In Your Pocket

Sharecare, the Atlanta-based digital platform for expert health information, is trying to help consumers take the guesswork out of at-home diagnoses with AskMD, a free, iOS 7-exclusive app out today. The app takes you through a highly personalized, step-by-step consultation that narrows down your possible health conditions to the best possible matches for you.

Fueling Our Future: This Is What School Lunches Actually Look Like

To call awareness to the reality of school lunches and their questionable nutritional value and color palette (beige, gray, and brown seem to be the primary colors), Farah Sheikh, an education campaign manager at the nonprofit, Do Something, created Fed Up. The online campaign asked students to send in photos of their lunches and then vote on which ones they would “eat” and which they would “toss.” Images included the barf-tastic "Pork Slop" from Mississippi and the delightfully colorful lunch combo titled "lunch is pretty awesome" from Texas.