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The results showed that neighborhoods with denser street networks had lower rates of obesity, and that cities with denser networks also had lower rates for diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease (but not asthma). “We found the more compact street networks correlated with reduced rates of obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease,” the authors write.

Your Car-Centric City Is Why You’re Fat

(Source: cadenced)

Liquid calories be gone! Sugary drinks have nowhere to hide with Vessyl, a cup with sensors that measures and reads out calories and nutritional info in beverages. 
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Liquid calories be gone! Sugary drinks have nowhere to hide with Vessyl, a cup with sensors that measures and reads out calories and nutritional info in beverages. 

Read More>

The $4 billion gum industry has gone into freefall, with sales down 11% and volume down 20% in the past five years. No type of gum is immune—everything from sugar-free gum to bubble gum is experiencing the drop in sales. What’s going on?
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The $4 billion gum industry has gone into freefall, with sales down 11% and volume down 20% in the past five years. No type of gum is immune—everything from sugar-free gum to bubble gum is experiencing the drop in sales. What’s going on?

Read More>

You may have seen the viral video “Old Man In Nursing Home Reacts To Music.” Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett talks about that moment and his documentary about reaching through dementia with music.

"Our film addresses some subjects people don’t like to talk about, yet it’s a joyous experience because we show that people suffering from memory loss still have this life inside that runs incredibly deep."
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You may have seen the viral video “Old Man In Nursing Home Reacts To Music.” Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett talks about that moment and his documentary about reaching through dementia with music.

image

"Our film addresses some subjects people don’t like to talk about, yet it’s a joyous experience because we show that people suffering from memory loss still have this life inside that runs incredibly deep."

Read More>

First standing desks, then walking desks. Now this?
Productivity seekers intimidated by treadmill desks can now thank the Kickstarter gods for Cubii, an elliptical desk companion. Much like the fitness machine found at your local gym, Cubii is a low-impact way to feel like you’re doing exercise. And, unlike treadmill desks, which can cost upwards of $1,000 and barely fit in a cubicle, Cubii slides right under your desk and retails for $350.
It’s a pretty simple concept: To deter the effects of Sedentary Death Syndrome, just pedal. It comes with an app to track progress. (Of course it does.)
Cubii has received more than $80,000 in funding, exceeding its Kickstarter goal.
Let us count the ways this is absurd.
Read More>

First standing desks, then walking desks. Now this?

Productivity seekers intimidated by treadmill desks can now thank the Kickstarter gods for Cubii, an elliptical desk companion. Much like the fitness machine found at your local gym, Cubii is a low-impact way to feel like you’re doing exercise. And, unlike treadmill desks, which can cost upwards of $1,000 and barely fit in a cubicle, Cubii slides right under your desk and retails for $350.

It’s a pretty simple concept: To deter the effects of Sedentary Death Syndrome, just pedal. It comes with an app to track progress. (Of course it does.)

Cubii has received more than $80,000 in funding, exceeding its Kickstarter goal.

Let us count the ways this is absurd.

Read More>

You’re probably not getting enough sleep, but you might not be as far off the mark as you think.
Most sleep experts would offer that aiming for between seven to nine hours of snooze time a night is optimal for feeling refreshed and productive the next day. In a new report researchers are closing in on what may just be that magic nightly number—and it’s not nine hours, or even eight as once believed.
Read More>

You’re probably not getting enough sleep, but you might not be as far off the mark as you think.

Most sleep experts would offer that aiming for between seven to nine hours of snooze time a night is optimal for feeling refreshed and productive the next day. In a new report researchers are closing in on what may just be that magic nightly number—and it’s not nine hours, or even eight as once believed.

Read More>