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Google’s interaction design guru explains why better haptics in our devices mean needing a better way to repair them when they break.
When you think about it, smartphones haven’t changed dramatically since the iPhone was first released in 2007. Sure, they have gotten faster, more powerful, and thinner. They have far better sound, displays, and cameras. But at the end of the day, we’re all still using our smartphones the same way we did then: by tapping a glass screen.
That’s frustrating, because there’s a world of other ways we could interact with our devices, from reaching through them to touch someone 3,000 miles away or using puffs of air to feel objects and textures in mid-air.
These methods of interacting with our devices are called haptics, and it’s the area in smartphone and mobile device design where innovation has virtually stood still since the introduction of the touch screen. Why?
Read More>

Google’s interaction design guru explains why better haptics in our devices mean needing a better way to repair them when they break.

When you think about it, smartphones haven’t changed dramatically since the iPhone was first released in 2007. Sure, they have gotten faster, more powerful, and thinner. They have far better sound, displays, and cameras. But at the end of the day, we’re all still using our smartphones the same way we did then: by tapping a glass screen.

That’s frustrating, because there’s a world of other ways we could interact with our devices, from reaching through them to touch someone 3,000 miles away or using puffs of air to feel objects and textures in mid-air.

These methods of interacting with our devices are called haptics, and it’s the area in smartphone and mobile device design where innovation has virtually stood still since the introduction of the touch screen. Why?

Read More>