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HBO director of digital and social media Jim Marsh breaks down the Game of Thrones approach to social marketing and fan engagement.

HBO has managed to ride the wave of fans’ organic social interaction around the show by getting involved in the conversations, while also using creative campaigns to keep stoking the fire during and between seasons. 


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HBO director of digital and social media Jim Marsh breaks down the Game of Thrones approach to social marketing and fan engagement.

HBO has managed to ride the wave of fans’ organic social interaction around the show by getting involved in the conversations, while also using creative campaigns to keep stoking the fire during and between seasons. 

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Director Alex Graves talks about balancing epic scale with intimate dialogue, the pressure of season four and his toughest scene.
THE TOUGHEST SCENE
After all the battles and action over the last two seasons, Graves says the bath scene from season three was one of the most difficult he’s ever directed in his life.
"What movie or TV show do you have with a guy and a girl who are knights, he’s basically been a psychopath, she’s a (tough) mass murderer with a heart and they’ve just been through a grotesque journey during which they’ve kind of fallen for each other. And he’s weak enough to say, ‘Hey, when I was a kid I was trying to do a good job for this guy but my dad said to lie to him, stab him in the back and kill him because it’ll be good for the family. So I did it and I’ve never been able to get over it.’ Maybe there’s a French film from last year with Julia Binoche that had a scene like that, but there’s not a scene like that floating around on Homeland.” Read more>

Director Alex Graves talks about balancing epic scale with intimate dialogue, the pressure of season four and his toughest scene.

THE TOUGHEST SCENE

After all the battles and action over the last two seasons, Graves says the bath scene from season three was one of the most difficult he’s ever directed in his life.

"What movie or TV show do you have with a guy and a girl who are knights, he’s basically been a psychopath, she’s a (tough) mass murderer with a heart and they’ve just been through a grotesque journey during which they’ve kind of fallen for each other. And he’s weak enough to say, ‘Hey, when I was a kid I was trying to do a good job for this guy but my dad said to lie to him, stab him in the back and kill him because it’ll be good for the family. So I did it and I’ve never been able to get over it.’ Maybe there’s a French film from last year with Julia Binoche that had a scene like that, but there’s not a scene like that floating around on Homeland.” Read more>

Game of Thrones costume designer Michele Clapton stitches symbolism into the show’s dark characters. “It’s so easy to draw a pretty dress in a fun way,” Clapton tells Fast Company. “But this is so much more about finding the right look and telling so much more about that character, and that’s what I really, really enjoy: the storytelling.” More>

Game of Thrones costume designer Michele Clapton stitches symbolism into the show’s dark characters. “It’s so easy to draw a pretty dress in a fun way,” Clapton tells Fast Company. “But this is so much more about finding the right look and telling so much more about that character, and that’s what I really, really enjoy: the storytelling.” More>



"Games Of Thrones" And "Walking Dead": Turning Great TV Into Interactive Stories


On the heels of its critically acclaimed Walking Dead game series, Telltale Games is now taking on another Hollywood property and adapting it into an interactive experience: HBO’s Game of Thrones. The first title will be released in 2014. The news has incited much buzz in the games world, given Telltale’s track record of borrowing the best from TV—focusing on characters and strong story lines, and even releasing games in episodes—in order to create an immersive experience that goes far beyond your typical shoot-em-up adrenaline rush.
On the heels of its critically acclaimed Walking Dead game series, Telltale Games is now taking on another Hollywood property and adapting it into an interactive experience: HBO’s Game of Thrones. The first title will be released in 2014. The news has incited much buzz in the games world, given Telltale’s track record of borrowing the best from TV—focusing on characters and strong story lines, and even releasing games in episodes—in order to create an immersive experience that goes far beyond your typical shoot-em-up adrenaline rush.
No one likes paying for cable. But the rise of the pay-TV business model led to the revolution in quality we’re currently enjoying from HBO shows like Thrones, as well as basic-cable programs like Mad Men and Breaking Bad. Years ago, when channels only received revenue from advertising, they made shows to reach as many people as possible, whether viewers loved them or just tuned in because they happened to be on. Cable changed those incentives, rewarding the creation of shows viewers felt strongly enough to pay for (indirectly in the case of channels like FX and AMC). That made nuanced drama profitable on television—and the best television more sophisticated than film. Sometimes, you really do get what you pay for.

NO ONE LIKES PAYING FOR CABLE. BUT THE RISE OF THE PAY-TV BUSINESS MODEL LED TO THE REVOLUTION IN QUALITY WE’RE CURRENTLY ENJOYING FROM HBO SHOWS LIKE THRONES.

Shows like Game of Thrones cost big bucks. Each episode of the first season reportedly had a budget of more than $5 million. Most such shows don’t attract all that many viewers compared to cheaper mainstream programs like American Idol. And if Game of Thrones sounds like easy money, remember that it has to generate enough profit to make up for Romeand John From Cincinnati. If HBO sold every show by the episode right away, it would have to charge a premium for hits to make up for its inevitable misses
How “Game Of Thrones” Pirates Could End A Golden Age Of TV

No one likes paying for cable. But the rise of the pay-TV business model led to the revolution in quality we’re currently enjoying from HBO shows like Thrones, as well as basic-cable programs like Mad Men and Breaking Bad. Years ago, when channels only received revenue from advertising, they made shows to reach as many people as possible, whether viewers loved them or just tuned in because they happened to be on. Cable changed those incentives, rewarding the creation of shows viewers felt strongly enough to pay for (indirectly in the case of channels like FX and AMC). That made nuanced drama profitable on television—and the best television more sophisticated than film. Sometimes, you really do get what you pay for.

NO ONE LIKES PAYING FOR CABLE. BUT THE RISE OF THE PAY-TV BUSINESS MODEL LED TO THE REVOLUTION IN QUALITY WE’RE CURRENTLY ENJOYING FROM HBO SHOWS LIKE THRONES.

Shows like Game of Thrones cost big bucks. Each episode of the first season reportedly had a budget of more than $5 million. Most such shows don’t attract all that many viewers compared to cheaper mainstream programs like American Idol. And if Game of Thrones sounds like easy money, remember that it has to generate enough profit to make up for Romeand John From Cincinnati. If HBO sold every show by the episode right away, it would have to charge a premium for hits to make up for its inevitable misses

How “Game Of Thrones” Pirates Could End A Golden Age Of TV