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Fantastical NonfictionNames that tune in 3 notes No, it’s not a contestant from the classic TV game show. It’s an IBM computer that uses algorithmic computation to identify a song’s musical period—Baroque, Classical or Romantic— in only three notes. And when applied to speech patterns, the same technology can be used as an early warning system for Parkinson’s disease and certain kinds of psychiatric disorders. Read on →

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Fantastical Nonfiction
Names that tune in 3 notes

No, it’s not a contestant from the classic TV game show. It’s an IBM computer that uses algorithmic computation to identify a song’s musical period—Baroque, Classical or Romantic— in only three notes. And when applied to speech patterns, the same technology can be used as an early warning system for Parkinson’s disease and certain kinds of psychiatric disorders. 
Read on →

Call Me Ishmael Is An Intimate, Multimedia Love Letter To Books
Leave a voicemail about a book you love and a story you’ve lived, the project asks.
It was a long flight, and one woman had brought Cutting For Stone by Abraham Verghese to occupy herself. When she got to the book’s saddest passage, she started sobbing. “I mean complete, shameless, snot flowing down my face sobbing,” she says. That’s when another woman sitting across the aisle from her handed her a tissue she had been holding in anticipation of this moment. “I read that book a few weeks ago, and I knew you were getting close,” she said.
This is one of many anonymous stories about books that has been told to Ishmael, of the site Call Me Ishmael, since it launched in June. The premise is simple: Anyone can call the site’s phone number and answer the prompt, “Leave a voicemail about a book you love and a story you’ve lived.”
Ishmael, who is voiced by TED-Ed director Logan Smalley, turns one of those voicemails each week into a video by sticking his iPhone to his typewriter with silly putty and running a transcription of the message through the roller to the speed of the audio. From a single prompt, the site has unleashed a wide range of stories.
Read More>

Call Me Ishmael Is An Intimate, Multimedia Love Letter To Books

Leave a voicemail about a book you love and a story you’ve lived, the project asks.

It was a long flight, and one woman had brought Cutting For Stone by Abraham Verghese to occupy herself. When she got to the book’s saddest passage, she started sobbing. “I mean complete, shameless, snot flowing down my face sobbing,” she says. That’s when another woman sitting across the aisle from her handed her a tissue she had been holding in anticipation of this moment. “I read that book a few weeks ago, and I knew you were getting close,” she said.

This is one of many anonymous stories about books that has been told to Ishmael, of the site Call Me Ishmael, since it launched in June. The premise is simple: Anyone can call the site’s phone number and answer the prompt, “Leave a voicemail about a book you love and a story you’ve lived.”

Ishmael, who is voiced by TED-Ed director Logan Smalley, turns one of those voicemails each week into a video by sticking his iPhone to his typewriter with silly putty and running a transcription of the message through the roller to the speed of the audio. From a single prompt, the site has unleashed a wide range of stories.

Read More>

Could you walk away from a job that paid more than half a million a year? That’s what Kathryn Cicoletti did when she created MakinSense Babe, a video-driven site that translates financial news and investment advice into language that everyone can understand. Described by Forbes as “The Daily Show, but swap out Jon Stewart for an attractive blonde using clever analogies and wry wit to simplify financial topics,” Cicoletti’s videos skewer the mainstream financial industry, while making savvy investors of her subscribers.

"I spent a lot of time looking at the landscape to see what is out there and what other people were doing. I wanted to be sure that I was coming at finance and money topics from a different angle. I love the idea of taking things that are generally boring—sorry, finance is really boring, let’s be honest—and making them entertaining.”
Read More>

Could you walk away from a job that paid more than half a million a year? That’s what Kathryn Cicoletti did when she created MakinSense Babe, a video-driven site that translates financial news and investment advice into language that everyone can understand. Described by Forbes as “The Daily Show, but swap out Jon Stewart for an attractive blonde using clever analogies and wry wit to simplify financial topics,” Cicoletti’s videos skewer the mainstream financial industry, while making savvy investors of her subscribers.

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"I spent a lot of time looking at the landscape to see what is out there and what other people were doing. I wanted to be sure that I was coming at finance and money topics from a different angle. I love the idea of taking things that are generally boring—sorry, finance is really boring, let’s be honest—and making them entertaining.”

Read More>

"If you ask a kid, ‘Hey do you want to learn how to program a computer?’ you’ll get a lot of eye-rolling. But if you’re like, ‘Hey, would you like to build your own game?’ that is what gets kids excited."
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"If you ask a kid, ‘Hey do you want to learn how to program a computer?’ you’ll get a lot of eye-rolling. But if you’re like, ‘Hey, would you like to build your own game?’ that is what gets kids excited."

Read More>

Bee hives are a little terrifying. Colonies have 20,000 to 60,000 bees, all of whom beat their wings 200 times per second. It’s amazing, then, that videographer-photographer Michael Sutton, was only stung three times while shooting his high-speed short, Apis Mellifera: Honey Bee.
Watch>

Bee hives are a little terrifying. Colonies have 20,000 to 60,000 bees, all of whom beat their wings 200 times per second. It’s amazing, then, that videographer-photographer Michael Sutton, was only stung three times while shooting his high-speed short, Apis Mellifera: Honey Bee.

Watch>