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“We’re somewhat the uninvited guest,” says Cliff Marks, president of sales and marketing at NCM Media Networks, which produces the program. “No one comes to the movies and says, ‘I wonder what’s going to be in the pre-show.’ But since we’ve created this show, you wouldn’t believe how great the consumer response is.”
When it launched in 2002, he says, people booed and threw stuff at the screen. Today, in surveys, 95% of viewers say they like it. 
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“We’re somewhat the uninvited guest,” says Cliff Marks, president of sales and marketing at NCM Media Networks, which produces the program. “No one comes to the movies and says, ‘I wonder what’s going to be in the pre-show.’ But since we’ve created this show, you wouldn’t believe how great the consumer response is.”

When it launched in 2002, he says, people booed and threw stuff at the screen. Today, in surveys, 95% of viewers say they like it. 

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When two actor friends waded into the Occupy Wall Street protests while pretending to be obnoxious investment bankers, Brendan Gibbons knew he had the foundation for a humorous and morally ambiguous tale about “the defining issue of our time.”
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When two actor friends waded into the Occupy Wall Street protests while pretending to be obnoxious investment bankers, Brendan Gibbons knew he had the foundation for a humorous and morally ambiguous tale about “the defining issue of our time.”

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A Very Special “Everything Wrong With” Featuring Neil DeGrasse Tyson And “Gravity”

The “Everything Wrong With” series from Cinema Sins is a popular, fun way to make you feel dumb for liking things (yet smart for knowing why you shouldn’t). The latest edition of the ongoing series has a special guest who can make you feel especially stupid for enjoying Gravity: Namely, Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson, America’s favorite astrophysicist, who interjects with some very science-y reasons why the Sandra Bullock mega-hit is bad and you should feel bad for liking it.

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Shooting a film is stressful enough. It’s even more stressful if you’re shooting in China, and your principal actor remains something of a permanent fixture on the Chinese government’s shit list. Yet, somehow, filmmaker Jason Wishnow was able to pull off casting famous Chinese political activist and artist Ai Weiwei in a Kickstarter-funded sci-fi film, one in which the artist plays a water smuggler in a heavily polluted, water-scarce future. There’s only one problem: Ai Weiwei just wiped the $88,000-funded project from the Internet.
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Shooting a film is stressful enough. It’s even more stressful if you’re shooting in China, and your principal actor remains something of a permanent fixture on the Chinese government’s shit list. Yet, somehow, filmmaker Jason Wishnow was able to pull off casting famous Chinese political activist and artist Ai Weiwei in a Kickstarter-funded sci-fi film, one in which the artist plays a water smuggler in a heavily polluted, water-scarce future. There’s only one problem: Ai Weiwei just wiped the $88,000-funded project from the Internet.

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kickstarter:

“I think Aaron’s story is compelling for lots of different reasons. My previous film We Are Legion followed hackers and activists, so I was following Aaron’s story right from when he was arrested. He was so deeply engaged in so many issues that are really relevant about information, our relationship with information, the way the Internet is changing, and the freedoms of the Internet. And then I was struck by how much his story resonated with people far beyond the communities in which he was a celebrity—people that didn’t even know him.” 
—Brian Knappenberger, director of The Internet’s Own Boy, on Aaron Swartz. Read the rest of the Q&A and watch the new trailer, over here.

kickstarter:

I think Aaron’s story is compelling for lots of different reasons. My previous film We Are Legion followed hackers and activists, so I was following Aaron’s story right from when he was arrested. He was so deeply engaged in so many issues that are really relevant about information, our relationship with information, the way the Internet is changing, and the freedoms of the Internet. And then I was struck by how much his story resonated with people far beyond the communities in which he was a celebrity—people that didn’t even know him.”

—Brian Knappenberger, director of The Internet’s Own Boy, on Aaron Swartz. Read the rest of the Q&A and watch the new trailer, over here.

A movie will come out and you will have 17 days [of theatrical exclusivity], that’s exactly three weekends, which is 95% of the revenue for 98% of movies. On the 18th day, these movies will be available everywhere ubiquitously and you will pay for the size. A movie screen will be $15. A 75” TV will be $4.00. A smartphone will be $1.99. When that happens, and it will happen, it will reinvent the enterprise of movies.

Jeffrey Katzenberg Predicts That Future Moviegoers Will “Pay By The Inch”
The Ghostbusters 30th Anniversary Exhibit Is An Ectoplasmic Explosion Of Fan Art
Something strange is coming to your neighborhood. This year marks the 30th anniversary of the classic comedy romp, Ghostbusters, and to celebrate, LA-based Gallery1988 (which has been home to exhibits based on many pop culture giants, including Breaking Bad and Arrested Development) has commissioned a road show exhibit of 80 Busters-based artworks. 
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The Ghostbusters 30th Anniversary Exhibit Is An Ectoplasmic Explosion Of Fan Art

Something strange is coming to your neighborhood. This year marks the 30th anniversary of the classic comedy romp, Ghostbusters, and to celebrate, LA-based Gallery1988 (which has been home to exhibits based on many pop culture giants, including Breaking Bad and Arrested Development) has commissioned a road show exhibit of 80 Busters-based artworks. 

Slideshow>

The TBWA creative director talks about his collaboration with director Jonathan Glazer and breaks down his storytelling process.

A keen attention to detail, particularly unexpected details, is clear in Campbell’s work. Part of that, he says, is how his process for constructing a story always keeps an eye on the sidelines. “It’s weird,” says Campbell. “It’s like tunnel vision and peripheral vision at the same time. I know where I want to go eventually but I’m also interested in everything that’s going on at the margins. So I‘m trying to bring in things that perhaps shouldn’t matter, but I’m thinking about what that thing that shouldn’t matter has to do with where I’m going.”

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The TBWA creative director talks about his collaboration with director Jonathan Glazer and breaks down his storytelling process.

A keen attention to detail, particularly unexpected details, is clear in Campbell’s work. Part of that, he says, is how his process for constructing a story always keeps an eye on the sidelines. “It’s weird,” says Campbell. “It’s like tunnel vision and peripheral vision at the same time. I know where I want to go eventually but I’m also interested in everything that’s going on at the margins. So I‘m trying to bring in things that perhaps shouldn’t matter, but I’m thinking about what that thing that shouldn’t matter has to do with where I’m going.”

Read More>