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Summer 2014 is officially dead. Nobody seems upset about that, because it was a weird one. For the first time in all of human history, there was no official Song of the Summer (stop trying to make “Fancy” happen). A movie featuring a talking raccoon made over half a billion dollars, and you loved it. Famous people poured ice buckets on stuff. As the empty calories of summer entertainment recede into the rearview, however, we welcome a far more nourishing batch of creativity. Fall is a time for Oscar bait, the return of TV, and an unwieldy number of must-listen albums dropping on the same Tuesday. In order to help cut through the clutter, Co.Create has prepared a guide to the most promising movies, shows, albums, tours, and other fun stuff coming your way in September. If you somehow manage to get bored with all these options available, well, you should be ashamed of yourself.
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Summer 2014 is officially dead. Nobody seems upset about that, because it was a weird one. For the first time in all of human history, there was no official Song of the Summer (stop trying to make “Fancy” happen). A movie featuring a talking raccoon made over half a billion dollars, and you loved it. Famous people poured ice buckets on stuff. As the empty calories of summer entertainment recede into the rearview, however, we welcome a far more nourishing batch of creativity. Fall is a time for Oscar bait, the return of TV, and an unwieldy number of must-listen albums dropping on the same Tuesday. In order to help cut through the clutter, Co.Create has prepared a guide to the most promising movies, shows, albums, tours, and other fun stuff coming your way in September. If you somehow manage to get bored with all these options available, well, you should be ashamed of yourself.

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Drew Daywalt, author of the colorful children’s bestseller The Day the Crayons Quit, reveals how horror films inspire his work.

Daywalt’s Twitter bio provides more insight into his off-kilter sensibilities: “I grew up in a haunted house, reading Dr. Seuss.” Which might explain why, besides penning enormously popular children’s books, Daywalt also writes and directs horror films. That’s right, the author who’s become a literary darling among librarians and parents alike is also a slasher fanatic. “I want to be Willy Wonka,” Daywalt says. “He has a really fun spirited side but also a dark, justice-giver side.”
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Drew Daywalt, author of the colorful children’s bestseller The Day the Crayons Quit, reveals how horror films inspire his work.

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Daywalt’s Twitter bio provides more insight into his off-kilter sensibilities: “I grew up in a haunted house, reading Dr. Seuss.” Which might explain why, besides penning enormously popular children’s books, Daywalt also writes and directs horror films. That’s right, the author who’s become a literary darling among librarians and parents alike is also a slasher fanatic. “I want to be Willy Wonka,” Daywalt says. “He has a really fun spirited side but also a dark, justice-giver side.”

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Lee returns to the old neighborhood, with cast members, new friends, and Beats.
Do The Right Thing is 25 years old now. This past week’s events in Ferguson, Missouri have made clear that the film’s depiction of racial tensions in America are still relevant (and Public Enemy’s “Fight The Power” still sounds as good as ever)—but Spike Lee’s depiction of the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood in Brooklyn doesn’t necessarily resemble the Brooklyn and Bed-Stuy of 2014.
Read More>

Lee returns to the old neighborhood, with cast members, new friends, and Beats.

Do The Right Thing is 25 years old now. This past week’s events in Ferguson, Missouri have made clear that the film’s depiction of racial tensions in America are still relevant (and Public Enemy’s “Fight The Power” still sounds as good as ever)—but Spike Lee’s depiction of the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood in Brooklyn doesn’t necessarily resemble the Brooklyn and Bed-Stuy of 2014.

Read More>

Guardians of the Galaxy’s makeup FX artist David White talks about the hands-on approach to conjuring the film’s unusual characters.
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Guardians of the Galaxy’s makeup FX artist David White talks about the hands-on approach to conjuring the film’s unusual characters.

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Quotacle lets users search through over 250,000 lines of dialogue from 143 movies.
Everybody knows what the first and second rules of Fight Club are. Ditto the identity of Luke’s father. Sometimes, however, a bit of dialogue drops from someone’s lips and just hangs there in your ear canal, undiagnosed. Neither the title of the film nor the context in which this line was uttered break through the clatter of your overwhelmed modern-day brain. Googling might’ve helped, but it also might not have. Instead, this is a job for the movie quote search engine—a thing that now exists.
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Quotacle lets users search through over 250,000 lines of dialogue from 143 movies.

Everybody knows what the first and second rules of Fight Club are. Ditto the identity of Luke’s father. Sometimes, however, a bit of dialogue drops from someone’s lips and just hangs there in your ear canal, undiagnosed. Neither the title of the film nor the context in which this line was uttered break through the clatter of your overwhelmed modern-day brain. Googling might’ve helped, but it also might not have. Instead, this is a job for the movie quote search engine—a thing that now exists.

Read More>

When you make a B movie, it’s best not to question the plot—no matter how ridiculous it is, advises Anthony C. Ferrante, the director of Sharknado, which debuted on Syfy last summer. “It bogs you down if you worry about that stuff,” Ferrante says, musing, “A sharknado can do whatever we tell it to do. It can tear through cars. It can go into the subway. And it doesn’t have to have a reason for anything. That’s the beauty of it. And once you accept it for what it is creatively as a director, you’re liberated because you’re not going, ‘Sharks in a tornado can’t really come into the city and do this!’” 
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When you make a B movie, it’s best not to question the plot—no matter how ridiculous it is, advises Anthony C. Ferrante, the director of Sharknado, which debuted on Syfy last summer. “It bogs you down if you worry about that stuff,” Ferrante says, musing, “A sharknado can do whatever we tell it to do. It can tear through cars. It can go into the subway. And it doesn’t have to have a reason for anything. That’s the beauty of it. And once you accept it for what it is creatively as a director, you’re liberated because you’re not going, ‘Sharks in a tornado can’t really come into the city and do this!’” 

Read More>