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The Recommender: Leslie Dela Vega, Fast Company’s Director of Photography

Name: Leslie Dela Vega
Role at Fast Company: Director of Photography
Twitter: @leslied_v
Titillating fact: Since she was a teenager, she has often dreamt of flying. “Flying through the air, free, happy. It’s a drug-free high. I look forward to falling asleep to do just that.” So this Saturday, Leslie is going on her first tandem skydiving jump, “hoping to re-create that feeling in real life.”

Things she’s loving:

1. Talia Herman’s photography

On Tuesday, I met with Talia Herman, a photographer from Guerneville, California. I told my partner I’d love to retire in this small town. It has just one intersection, but has redwood trees and the Russian River at its feet. Silence. Herman’s portfolio was similar: quiet, thoughtful. So after meeting her, I went on her blog, where there is so much eye candy. Her project of following Guerneville residents was raw, deep, personal at times. Her color palette, muted for some, gives me an antiquated, inside feel of these lives.

2. The Greenpoint, Brooklyn Nazi skinhead project

I received a book from Adam Krause, a photographer whose personal projects were intriguing and inviting. He covers subjects that are honed and minutely specific. You can see an example of these subjects in the Greenpoint, Brooklyn Nazi skinheads project. Another? Alligator hunting + commerce. Beautifully lit, nicely composed portraits of alligators and their hunters.

3. Life On Sundays

I have to admit, this isn’t a new find. But I go to this site as often as possible. It’s nice to scroll down FOREVER and look at photos, but not just any photos. These photos are of design, architecture, people, sex, all of which totally work together in this layout. Graphic lines, colors, shapes, text, and men’s clothing, which I myself as a woman prefer half the time.

[Image: Flickr user Horia Varlan]

The Recommender: Matt Mankins, Fast Company’s Chief Technology Officer
Name: Matt MankinsRole at Fast Company: Chief Technology OfficerTwitter: @mankinsTitillating fact: Matt used to be “really really really” into mail art. He lived in Miami and would find coconuts in his yard, paint them, and send them to people. He also sent fossils, a puzzle, leaves, and other objects. If you get a random painted coconut in the mail, you know who it’s from.
Things he’s loving:
1. The Mumbai New York Scranton FAQ page
When I finished reading Tamara Shopsin’s book, Mumbai New York Scranton, I wanted more. So I Googled and found this site that reminded me of the best parts of the early web. I found myself clicking all the links. By the end I was satiated, and felt okay that the book was over. (No spoilers, so feel free to click)
2. Memrise
I’ve been trying to brush up on my Spanish, and find this site amazingly fun and effective. Memrise “grows” your memory through planting the concepts, watering them, and harvesting them at just the right time. I’m pretty excited about how the educational system is evolving and adapting to new scientific studies.
3. Brooklyn Problems
My wife has a side project illustrating “Brooklyn Problems”—things she’s overheard or experienced on the streets of our borough. She recently coined “the Gauntlet of Charity,” which makes me miss sniglet calendars that I used to have in the ’90s.
4. Mameshiba 
An extra recommendation, because this was the link that got the most laughs when it was shared around the office this week.
 
[Images & Post by Jessica Hullinger]

The Recommender: Matt Mankins, Fast Company’s Chief Technology Officer

Name: Matt Mankins
Role at Fast CompanyChief Technology Officer
Twitter@mankins
Titillating fact: Matt used to be “really really really” into mail art. He lived in Miami and would find coconuts in his yard, paint them, and send them to people. He also sent fossils, a puzzle, leaves, and other objects. If you get a random painted coconut in the mail, you know who it’s from.

Things he’s loving:

1. The Mumbai New York Scranton FAQ page

When I finished reading Tamara Shopsin’s book, Mumbai New York Scranton, I wanted more. So I Googled and found this site that reminded me of the best parts of the early web. I found myself clicking all the links. By the end I was satiated, and felt okay that the book was over. (No spoilers, so feel free to click)

2. Memrise

I’ve been trying to brush up on my Spanish, and find this site amazingly fun and effective. Memrise “grows” your memory through planting the concepts, watering them, and harvesting them at just the right time. I’m pretty excited about how the educational system is evolving and adapting to new scientific studies.

3. Brooklyn Problems

My wife has a side project illustrating “Brooklyn Problems”—things she’s overheard or experienced on the streets of our borough. She recently coined “the Gauntlet of Charity,” which makes me miss sniglet calendars that I used to have in the ’90s.

4. Mameshiba 

An extra recommendation, because this was the link that got the most laughs when it was shared around the office this week.

 

[Images & Post by Jessica Hullinger]

Meet Joel Arabaje, Fast Company’s Online Photo Editor and the King of Selfies. Joel originally wanted to be a veterinarian. For a while he was a Rat Laboratory Technician at Queens College, where he tended to the needs of the tiny rodents. In high school, he was a pet groomer. These days, he’s a photographer, illustrator, and designer. For his latest project, Joel is taking a selfie every day for a year, and posting each photo to Instagram. 
Here, the 3 best things Joel found on the Internet this week.

Meet Joel Arabaje, Fast Company’s Online Photo Editor and the King of Selfies. Joel originally wanted to be a veterinarian. For a while he was a Rat Laboratory Technician at Queens College, where he tended to the needs of the tiny rodents. In high school, he was a pet groomer. These days, he’s a photographer, illustrator, and designer. For his latest project, Joel is taking a selfie every day for a year, and posting each photo to Instagram. 

Here, the 3 best things Joel found on the Internet this week.