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Now that Google has reportedly agreed to buy Israeli crowd-powered navigation app Waze for $1.3 billion, many other “Silicon Wadi” startups are daring to dream big. Here are some others that could potentially follow in Waze’s footsteps:

  • Powermat: Battery drainage is one of the biggest problems faced by consumers as they increase their reliance on smartphones. Enter Powermat, whose wireless power solutions help millions charge their devices between home, car, and office.

  • Wibbitz: Wibbitz’s text-to-video platform uses advanced language processing to allow anything published online to be instantly turned into a video clip. Its publisher solution—which boasts a clientele of 50,000 websites and 17 million monthly viewers—will soon be available for iPhone.

  • Parko: Recent studies show that city drivers spend at least 20 minutes on average searching for a parking spot. Parko has developed a crowdsourcing solution for parking in a similar vein to Waze’s solution for traffic: It connects motorists looking for a spot with others about to leave one, while its algorithm identifies parking spots without users needing to remove their phones from their pockets.

6 Israeli startups to watch as Google reportedly buys Waze for $1.3 billion

A nationally representative scientific sample of over 19,000 married and divorced people found that almost 35% of couples who married between 2005 and 2012 originally met each other online. The couples who met online were less likely to divorce, even after controlling for age, education, income, and race. Meeting over the web was also independently correlated with higher levels of marital satisfaction.
Interestingly, it matters where a couple first meets: in the wholesome, well-lit hotel ballrooms of Match.com and eHarmony? The banal, crowded corridors of Facebook?
This study says a lot about the different kinds of “neighborhoods” that people frequent online. Read more
[Image: Flickr user Patrik Jones]

A nationally representative scientific sample of over 19,000 married and divorced people found that almost 35% of couples who married between 2005 and 2012 originally met each other online. The couples who met online were less likely to divorce, even after controlling for age, education, income, and race. Meeting over the web was also independently correlated with higher levels of marital satisfaction.

Interestingly, it matters where a couple first meets: in the wholesome, well-lit hotel ballrooms of Match.com and eHarmony? The banal, crowded corridors of Facebook?

This study says a lot about the different kinds of “neighborhoods” that people frequent online. Read more

[Image: Flickr user Patrik Jones]

Goranka Bjedov, a capacity software engineer at Facebook, cracked the audience up at a Girls in Tech/Facebook meetup in NYC. She spoke candidly about her career mistakes with lines like, "I’m really good at figuring things out 10 years after the fact."

A few of her best tips were:

"Plan your career. Make a plan and figure out how to get there. Know where you want to be in 3, 5, 10 years. And check in with it to make sure that you’re not stuck." 

She emphasized that having programming skills provides women with job security and financial independence.

'Once you learn programming you can do literally anything you want anywhere you want.'

And in explaining why it is so valuable for a woman to learn coding she predicted that in the near future, “we’ll be teaching programming in elementary school because it will be a part of daily life.”

You can read Goranka Bjedov's tips for programmers here.

A recent Girls in Tech/Facebook meetup about learning from your career mistakes was full of actionable pieces of advice, particularly on finding and keeping good mentors. Here are some of the best quotes of the night:

On the importance of having mentors:

"Build a network of women. You don’t have to be on your own." -AT&T’s Amanda Stent

"Have a strong network both at work and outside of work. Talking about work issues helps you get through them." -Catherine Hui 

 On choosing your mentors:
"Do your homework in approaching a mentor - don’t ask someone just based on reputation" -Tweeted by @AmyVernon

"If you don’t feel comfortable with your mentor, maybe that person isn’t the right mentor. " -Bloomberg’s Catherine Hui 

On being mentored:

"If you go to therapy, you don’t lie to your shrink. Same philosophy applies to mentors. Be honest with them." - Nikki Stevens (@drnikki)

Who are your mentors? How did you find them? How important is it to you to have a mentor?

(Photos by M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger)

Bloomberg’s head of technology for Tradebook Equity Catherine Hui handed out tons of great career tips at a recent Girls in Tech/Facebook meetup. Here, some of the best:

 On mistakes:

"Acknowledge your mistakes and you’ll be fine."

"It’s not about making a mistake - it’s about how you handle it."

"The sky is going to fall at some point. The key is how you handle the post-mortem." 

On mentorship:

"Find someone who has your best interest in mind - that’s a true mentor."

Don’t be shy. People want to help you.

Meet with your mentors/members of your network regularly.

Choose your mentor wisely.

Have at least one or two awesome geeks in your network of mentors.

On who she hires:

What blogs do they follow? What is their favorite news source? Does this person have a natural curiosity for what’s happening?

Can this person learn fast?

People don’t necessarily need to have a tech background- but they should have communication skills, be a team player, and most importantly they should have common sense/strong problem solving skills.

And finally, these gems: 

"We [women] need to learn how to ask for things … Men never wait to ask."

“I didn’t become who I am by accident. I struggled through the whole journey.” 

Read more about the event here! Also, here are some tips for finding (and keeping) great mentors. 

By M. Cecelia Bittner, Jessica Hullinger

"We always seem to view our role models as if they’ve made perfect choices every step of the way. If only that were really true!"

Facebook’s NYC headquarters was packed to the brim Tuesday night with career-minded techies looking to gain insight from a panel of some of the tech industry’s leading ladies. The chat was organized by Girls in Tech, a global organization “focused on the engagement, education and empowerment of powerful, influential women in technology and entrepreneurship,” and was moderated by Kickstarter’s Bethany Sumner.

The conversation originally focused on career mistakes, but veered to cover everything from mentorship to sexism in the workplace, and left guests with a heap of actionable tips. 

Who was on the panel:

What they said: 

“I didn’t become who I am by accident. I struggled through the whole journey.” -Catherine Hui (Bloomberg) 

"Don’t say ‘no’ out of fear. Say ‘yes’ to yourself. Know that you are worth it and that you can do it." -Amanda J. Stent (AT&T)

 "If you’re playing World of Warcraft 25 hours a week, you’re probably hiding from something in your life.” -Goranka Bjedov (Facebook)

"Make mistakes. Just don’t make the same mistake five times." -Bjedov

"Until I fail empirically, I am good enough to do the job."  -Nikki Stevens (formerly Refinery29)

What’s the biggest career mistake you’ve ever made, and how did you overcome it? Looking back, what piece of advice would you give your younger self? Tell us on Twitter with #FCadvice. 

Why Messaging Could Be Mobile’s Killer App
Could the next big platform fit inside a messaging app? 
Facebook’s new Android integration, Home, groups Instagram, maps, email, and other apps in one drawer. Its main screen has just three navigation options: “Apps,” “Last App,” and—the exceptional stand-alone app in the mix—“Messenger.”
Why has Facebook given such special treatment to a once tangential feature of its service?
Here’s a theory: “I think everyone is realizing that messaging is the killer app in mobile,” says Ted Livingston, the creator of a messenger app called Kik.

"Now it’s just who can wrap a platform around it the fastest."

Read the full story here.

Why Messaging Could Be Mobile’s Killer App

Could the next big platform fit inside a messaging app? 

Facebook’s new Android integration, Home, groups Instagram, maps, email, and other apps in one drawer. Its main screen has just three navigation options: “Apps,” “Last App,” and—the exceptional stand-alone app in the mix—“Messenger.”

Why has Facebook given such special treatment to a once tangential feature of its service?

Here’s a theory: “I think everyone is realizing that messaging is the killer app in mobile,” says Ted Livingston, the creator of a messenger app called Kik.

"Now it’s just who can wrap a platform around it the fastest."

Read the full story here.

"At one level, [Home] is just the next mobile version of Facebook. At a deeper level, I think this can start to be a change in the relationship that we have with how we use computing devices." -Mark Zuckerberg at the Facebook Home announcement address.

Reading Between The Lines Of Mark Zuckerberg’s Vision Statement

Home, Facebook’s new Android app-slash-skin, is worth investigating. It runs along a new axis of user experience, un-cordons the app, and shows how Facebook is becoming less of a product and more of a service.

But beyond being immersive, low-friction, and whatever other buzzword descriptors you’d like to attach to it, Home is a recognition a subtle and profound paradigm shift.

See our Takeaways from his address here.

The Facebook Phone is finally here. And, as expected, it’s not really a phone at all.
Home, as the new product is called, is a free, downloadable skin that gives existing Android phone a total Facebook makeover, transforming both lock and home screens into immersive, edge-to-edge slideshows of photos and status updates.

The Facebook Phone is finally here. And, as expected, it’s not really a phone at all.

Home, as the new product is called, is a free, downloadable skin that gives existing Android phone a total Facebook makeover, transforming both lock and home screens into immersive, edge-to-edge slideshows of photos and status updates.

(Source: fastcodesign.com)

Forget about checking Facebook on your iPhone or Android app. Or waiting until you get home. The social network introduced its own addition to the Android operating system in a highly-anticipated announcement today, called “Home.”

Home is a series of apps that you can install and that becomes the home of your phone.

"Our phones are designed around apps not people," Zuckerberg said. "We want to flip that around."

Forget about checking Facebook on your iPhone or Android app. Or waiting until you get home. The social network introduced its own addition to the Android operating system in a highly-anticipated announcement today, called “Home.”

Home is a series of apps that you can install and that becomes the home of your phone.

"Our phones are designed around apps not people," Zuckerberg said. "We want to flip that around."

Here are some of the 23 Most Creative Marriage Equality Facebook Pictures

Last week, as the Supreme Court heard arguments about whether it should legalize gay marriage, the Human Rights Campaignreleased a new version of its classic logo. While it’s normally a yellow equals sign on a blue background, this new logo was a white on red. The HRC encouraged people to change their Facebook avatars to their logo to show their support for the cause.

This being the Internet, however, people weren’t content to merely use the HRC’s logo in its original form. Quickly, new versions began popping up. Some were merely more artfully drawn equals symbols, but many more were humorous takes on the gay marriage debate, from popular maybe gay couples (Bert and Ernie, C3P0 and R2D2) to Internet memes (Grumpy Cat) to historic bits of cultural literacy that just happen to look like an equals sign (Mark Rothko). We’ve collected a gallery of some of our favorites above. 

Here’s more.