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To outsiders, Silicon Valley work culture seems almost like a joke: college kids pretending to be adults in unkempt hair who show up to business meetings wearing wrinkled T-shirts with jeans. But for the people entrenched in it, what could be better?
Glassdoor on Friday released its first report on the companies with the best work culture and values, as determined by reviews and ratings by former and current employees. Not only does Twitter top the list, but tech made a strong showing overall, filling 11 of the 25 spots. Aside from the microblogging service, the list also includes Google at No. 3, Facebook at No. 5, and Apple at No. 15.
What is it that Twitter employees love about their workplace?
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To outsiders, Silicon Valley work culture seems almost like a joke: college kids pretending to be adults in unkempt hair who show up to business meetings wearing wrinkled T-shirts with jeans. But for the people entrenched in it, what could be better?

Glassdoor on Friday released its first report on the companies with the best work culture and values, as determined by reviews and ratings by former and current employees. Not only does Twitter top the list, but tech made a strong showing overall, filling 11 of the 25 spots. Aside from the microblogging service, the list also includes Google at No. 3, Facebook at No. 5, and Apple at No. 15.

What is it that Twitter employees love about their workplace?

wired:


I liked one of my cousin’s updates, which he had re-shared from Joe Kennedy, and was subsequently beseiged with Kennedys to like (plus a Clinton and a Shriver). I liked Hootsuite. I liked The New York Times, I liked Coupon Clipinista. I liked something from a friend I haven’t spoken to in 20 years—something about her kid, camp and a snake. I liked Amazon. I liked fucking Kohl’s. I liked Kohl’s for you.
My News Feed took on an entirely new character in a surprisingly short amount of time. After checking in and liking a bunch of stuff over the course of an hour, there were no human beings in my feed anymore. It became about brands and messaging, rather than humans with messages.

MORE: I Liked Everything I Saw on Facebook for Two Days. Here’s What It Did to Me

wired:

I liked one of my cousin’s updates, which he had re-shared from Joe Kennedy, and was subsequently beseiged with Kennedys to like (plus a Clinton and a Shriver). I liked Hootsuite. I liked The New York Times, I liked Coupon Clipinista. I liked something from a friend I haven’t spoken to in 20 years—something about her kid, camp and a snake. I liked Amazon. I liked fucking Kohl’s. I liked Kohl’s for you.

My News Feed took on an entirely new character in a surprisingly short amount of time. After checking in and liking a bunch of stuff over the course of an hour, there were no human beings in my feed anymore. It became about brands and messaging, rather than humans with messages.

MORE: I Liked Everything I Saw on Facebook for Two Days. Here’s What It Did to Me

(Source: Wired)

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You probably have not heard of viral sensation James Ellis, “Actor/Fitness Model and follower of JESUS CHRIST,” as he describes himself on his Facebook page, which has over 1.3 million likes and counting. But you may have come across one of his videos in your news feed recently. For reasons that are still a mystery, these sketchy videos have been showing up everywhere—even in the feeds of people who have no idea who Ellis is.

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Here’s how to do it.

Ah, clickbait. The currency of the Internet! We just found out that Yongzhi Huang, one of the developers here at Fast Company, has built a neat little web tool that lets you create convincing fake news stories with which to troll your friends. 

imageUsing it is easy. Simply pick a news logo (Yahoo, Breaking News, etc.), write your fake headline, then put a link to the website of your choosing at the end. Even Reddit seems to like it!

So we asked Zhi to explain himself.

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What Facebook’s second-largest market reveals about its international ambitions
“This is how Facebook sees itself: As the most promising entry point to the Internet for the as-yet-unwired population. And the more that Facebook can blur the line so that Indians come to believe that Facebook is the Internet, rather than something you get when you go onto the Internet, the better it’ll be for Facebook.”
Read More>

What Facebook’s second-largest market reveals about its international ambitions

This is how Facebook sees itself: As the most promising entry point to the Internet for the as-yet-unwired population. And the more that Facebook can blur the line so that Indians come to believe that Facebook is the Internet, rather than something you get when you go onto the Internet, the better it’ll be for Facebook.”

Read More>