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On July 9, a Walmart representative told the Washington Post, that the retail giant would not pursue three planned D.C. stores if the city council’s living wage legislation—which would require major retailers to pay workers at least $12.50 per hour, instead of the current $8.25—passed. 
At the center of Walmart’s case are arguments that have been made pretty much any time any city tries to raise the wage standard for its workers: that higher wages are anti-business and negatively impact consumers. 
But really, much of Walmart’s historical fight against fair pay has been debunked. 
Like the myth that higher wages means fewer jobs.
"Part of the reason why higher wages don’t mean fewer jobs," says employment analyst Jack Temple, "is because higher wages offset high turnover." When you pay people more, they tend to stick around, and that gets rid of costs in new hires and absenteeism.
Here are 3 more bogus claims about why Walmart can’t pay a living wage.

On July 9, a Walmart representative told the Washington Post, that the retail giant would not pursue three planned D.C. stores if the city council’s living wage legislation—which would require major retailers to pay workers at least $12.50 per hour, instead of the current $8.25—passed. 

At the center of Walmart’s case are arguments that have been made pretty much any time any city tries to raise the wage standard for its workers: that higher wages are anti-business and negatively impact consumers.

But really, much of Walmart’s historical fight against fair pay has been debunked. 

Like the myth that higher wages means fewer jobs.

"Part of the reason why higher wages don’t mean fewer jobs," says employment analyst Jack Temple, "is because higher wages offset high turnover." When you pay people more, they tend to stick around, and that gets rid of costs in new hires and absenteeism.

Here are 3 more bogus claims about why Walmart can’t pay a living wage.

What’s the biggest mistake you’ve ever made (or observed) in a job interview?

The other day we wrote about 6 ways to secretly sabotage your job interview, and then we asked Facebook fans about the biggest interview mistakes they’ve ever seen. Here’s what they had to say: 
  • "Not having a convincing answer to what my strengths were." -Prashanth Challapalli
  • "When the interviewee doesn’t have a career path or salary expectation (expressing their own worth) is a turn off." - Garrett Fookes
  • "Not sending a thank you note after the interview…rookie mistake!" - The Forum: Stories That Create
  • "At the end when they say "do you have any questions" I said no. This one is a biggie." - Kathleen Stetka
  • "Sell myself short." - Milly Darby

Here, a few more. What’s the biggest interview mistake you’ve ever seen? 
"The job as we understood it is disappearing."
On Friday, May 24, at 2:00 p.m. EST senior writer Anya Kamenetz will be moderating a discussion with Glen Hiemstra, founder of Futurist.com, about how work will evolve over the next several decades both in America and globally.
Join us: Simply follow this link to register with Cisco’s WebEx software now, and then sign in on Friday to take part. Bring any questions you might have.


"The job as we understood it is disappearing."

On Friday, May 24, at 2:00 p.m. EST senior writer Anya Kamenetz will be moderating a discussion with Glen Hiemstra, founder of Futurist.com, about how work will evolve over the next several decades both in America and globally.

Join us: Simply follow this link to register with Cisco’s WebEx software now, and then sign in on Friday to take part. Bring any questions you might have.

Unemployment obviously reduces happiness, but not because of what you may think. It’s not the loss of income, but the loss of things like self-esteem and workplace social life that lead to a drop in happiness. High unemployment rates can trigger unhappiness even in the employed, who suddenly become fearful of losing their jobs. According to the study, even low quality jobs yield more satisfaction than being unemployed.

The World Happiness Report Explains What Makes People Happy