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How SAS Became The World’s Best Place To Work
Current statistics say that over half of Americans hate their job. Not so at the analytics software giant SAS, which was named the 2012 world’s best multinational workplace by The Great Place to Work institute.

More than anything, SAS has found that by being an especially benevolent and respectful organization, they consistently produce the most optimal workplace performance. Their highly nontraditional insight is that workers instinctively and positively respond to an organization that routinely demonstrates that they matter and are individually valued.

Here are four of the unique leadership values that have made SAS an especially great and productive place to work:
1. Value people above all else.
Founder and CEO Dr. Jim Goodnight told Fast Company that,

What makes his organization work are the new ideas that come out of his employee’s brains. Therefore he therefore holds his employees in the highest esteem. 

2. To give is to get.
SAS employees have amazing perks like free access to gyms, health care, and counseling.
Keeping in mind that SAS just as easily could give people more pay and forgo all the unique programs and benefits, Goodnight long ago figured out that perks are symbolic representations of how he and his company values its people. 
According to Jack Poll, a 28-year SAS employee and director of recreation and employee services, “when people are treated as if they’re important and truly make a difference, their loyalty and engagement soar.”

 3. Trust above all things.

“While we say we have a 35-hour workweek,” says CMO Jim Davis, “I don’t know anybody who really works 35 hours. The reality is if you trust people, and you ask them to do something—and you treat them like a human being as opposed to a commodity where you try to squeeze something out—they’re going to work all sorts of hours. But they’re going to enjoy those hours as opposed to ‘slaving in the office.’”

4. Ensure that employees know the significance of their work.

Goodnight intuited that everyone thrived on doing significant things, and from knowing their work had inherent value. And ever since, he’s seen it as his role to ensure his employees take great pride of ownership in all the work they do knowing “what they produce will be used all over the world, by people all over the world.”


What other tactics make your company a great place to work?

[Image: Flickr user Justin Hogue][Post: m.cecelia bittner]

How SAS Became The World’s Best Place To Work

Current statistics say that over half of Americans hate their job. Not so at the analytics software giant SAS, which was named the 2012 world’s best multinational workplace by The Great Place to Work institute.

More than anything, SAS has found that by being an especially benevolent and respectful organization, they consistently produce the most optimal workplace performance. Their highly nontraditional insight is that workers instinctively and positively respond to an organization that routinely demonstrates that they matter and are individually valued.

Here are four of the unique leadership values that have made SAS an especially great and productive place to work:

1. Value people above all else.

Founder and CEO Dr. Jim Goodnight told Fast Company that,

What makes his organization work are the new ideas that come out of his employee’s brains. Therefore he therefore holds his employees in the highest esteem. 

2. To give is to get.

SAS employees have amazing perks like free access to gyms, health care, and counseling.

Keeping in mind that SAS just as easily could give people more pay and forgo all the unique programs and benefits, Goodnight long ago figured out that perks are symbolic representations of how he and his company values its people. 

According to Jack Poll, a 28-year SAS employee and director of recreation and employee services, “when people are treated as if they’re important and truly make a difference, their loyalty and engagement soar.”

 3. Trust above all things.

“While we say we have a 35-hour workweek,” says CMO Jim Davis, “I don’t know anybody who really works 35 hours. The reality is if you trust people, and you ask them to do something—and you treat them like a human being as opposed to a commodity where you try to squeeze something out—they’re going to work all sorts of hours. But they’re going to enjoy those hours as opposed to ‘slaving in the office.’”

4. Ensure that employees know the significance of their work.

Goodnight intuited that everyone thrived on doing significant things, and from knowing their work had inherent value. And ever since, he’s seen it as his role to ensure his employees take great pride of ownership in all the work they do knowing “what they produce will be used all over the world, by people all over the world.”


What other tactics make your company a great place to work?


[Image: Flickr user Justin Hogue][Post: m.cecelia bittner]

The 5 rules of happy employees.
Happy employees don’t stay in one role for too long. Movement and the perception of improvement create satisfaction. Status quo, on the other hand, creates burnout.
There is a strong correlation between happiness and meaning; having a meaningful impact on the world around you is actually a better predictor of happiness than many other things you think will make you happy.
A workplace is far likelier to be a happy place when policies are in place to ensure that people regularly get acknowledgement and praise for a job well done.
Recognize that employees are people first, workers second, and create policies that focus on their well-being as individuals.
Emphasize work/life integration, not necessarily “balance.”



Is your company a happy company? If so, why? 
Fast Company and Workplace Happiness:
How To Make Your Employees Happier
The Corporate Pursuit of Happiness
The Formula for Creating Happiness at Work
The Sharp Drop-Off In Worker Happiness—And What Your Company Can Do About It



[Image by the Minimalists.com][Post by M.Cecelia Bittner]

The 5 rules of happy employees.

  1. Happy employees don’t stay in one role for too long. Movement and the perception of improvement create satisfaction. Status quo, on the other hand, creates burnout.
  2. There is a strong correlation between happiness and meaning; having a meaningful impact on the world around you is actually a better predictor of happiness than many other things you think will make you happy.
  3. A workplace is far likelier to be a happy place when policies are in place to ensure that people regularly get acknowledgement and praise for a job well done.
  4. Recognize that employees are people first, workers second, and create policies that focus on their well-being as individuals.
  5. Emphasize work/life integration, not necessarily “balance.”

Is your company a happy company? If so, why? 

Fast Company and Workplace Happiness:




[Image by the Minimalists.com][Post by M.Cecelia Bittner]