FastCompany Magazine

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usagov:
From the Peace Corps:
A Peace Corps Volunteer worked with a senior citizen group in Ecuador who wanted to show to their community that it is important to recycle and think about future generations. They planned a fashion show where they wore accessories made from recycled materials and invited the whole community to the event!
Educational and adorable!

usagov:

From the Peace Corps:

A Peace Corps Volunteer worked with a senior citizen group in Ecuador who wanted to show to their community that it is important to recycle and think about future generations. They planned a fashion show where they wore accessories made from recycled materials and invited the whole community to the event!

Educational and adorable!

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano is quitting her job to run the University of California. 
So what she learn while helming a government bureau that some call dysfunctional and which has been accused by politicians of needlessly wasting money while performing the vital roles of providing border defenses, immigration services, emergency relief, and transportation security?
Here’s a short list of her greatest hits.

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano is quitting her job to run the University of California. 

So what she learn while helming a government bureau that some call dysfunctional and which has been accused by politicians of needlessly wasting money while performing the vital roles of providing border defenses, immigration services, emergency relief, and transportation security?

Here’s a short list of her greatest hits.

A new film called Girl Rising shows how education affects nine girls from nine countries—with some help from famous voices like Meryl Streep, Cate Blanchett, and Anne Hathaway.
Investing in girls is said to have the best returns, dollar for dollar, of anything we can do in low-income locations.
Every extra year of schooling for girls leads to:
Increased incomes by 10% to 25%.
A rise in national wealth.
Lower rates of child mortality and HIV/AIDS.
Better educated future generations. 
"We can overcome many challenges that we’re trying to address in global development when girls are safe, educated, healthy, and empowered," says Girl Rising executive producer Holly Gordon. ”It’s the best investment you can make if you’re trying to make long-term strategic change in global development,” 
Read more here: The enormous opportunity in educating and empowering girls

A new film called Girl Rising shows how education affects nine girls from nine countries—with some help from famous voices like Meryl Streep, Cate Blanchett, and Anne Hathaway.

Investing in girls is said to have the best returns, dollar for dollar, of anything we can do in low-income locations.

Every extra year of schooling for girls leads to:

  • Increased incomes by 10% to 25%.
  • rise in national wealth.
  • Lower rates of child mortality and HIV/AIDS.
  • Better educated future generations. 

"We can overcome many challenges that we’re trying to address in global development when girls are safe, educated, healthy, and empowered," says Girl Rising executive producer Holly Gordon. ”It’s the best investment you can make if you’re trying to make long-term strategic change in global development,” 

Read more here: The enormous opportunity in educating and empowering girls

News Corp Gets Into The Tablet Business With Amplify
Joel Klein, head of News Corporation's new Amplify education brand, announced today at the South By Southwest Educationconference in Austin, Texas, that the company has designed its own branded Android tablet-sized computer. It comes bundled with software designed for teachers and students.
The Amplify tablet comes preloaded with a whole mess of content—Google Apps for Education, Common Sense Media-rated audio, video, games, online textbooks, Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary, and a graphing calculator. It has specialized search tools to find millions of hours worth of digital lessons and homework, all aligned to Common Core educational standards that are currently being adopted by most school systems. 

You could probably take it along with your 5-year-old kid to a desert island and get her halfway to a college degree.

But that’s not all. Amplify was built from News Corp’s acquisition of Wireless Generation, a major vendor of software-based data systems and assessment tools to schools. So in addition to the content, the new tablets will have lesson-plan builders and dashboard-style tools for teachers, principals, and parents to track and monitor students’ performance.
The 10-inch tablet will be marketed to states, districts, and individual schools for use this coming school year. The cost is $299 a pop for a Wi-Fi-enabled tablet when you buy a two-year subscription to Amplify-branded content, which costs $99 a year. Or you can get one with a 4G data plan for $349 per device and a $179 a year contract. This compares to $399a pop for a non-4G iPad, the most popular tablet in U.S. classrooms. The subscription fees include live chat, phone, and email support and professional development for teachers.
The enthusiasm for touchscreen tablets and phablets in education is surprising even the most ardent technology fans. Apple CEO Tim Cook has said ”the adoption of the iPad in education is something I’ve never seen in any technology.” Education spending on IT is estimated to be at least $20 billion annually, of which a little more than half is currently going to hardware. The Samsung Galaxy, Google Nexus, Kindle, Microsoft Surface, and even the Nook are allvying for market share.
Asked by Fast Company why Amplify wanted to enter this crowded field on the hardware side, Klein cited the power of an integrated hardware and software platform. “My view has been that if we don’t design a product that really facilitates and changes teaching and learning, and all the supports that go together to make this a robust package, then we’ll be where we’ve been [in the past].”
Read the full article here. 
As exciting as this is, one must wonder what happens to the students in schools that can’t afford these tools? 

News Corp Gets Into The Tablet Business With Amplify

Joel Klein, head of News Corporation's new Amplify education brand, announced today at the South By Southwest Educationconference in Austin, Texas, that the company has designed its own branded Android tablet-sized computer. It comes bundled with software designed for teachers and students.

The Amplify tablet comes preloaded with a whole mess of content—Google Apps for Education, Common Sense Media-rated audio, video, games, online textbooks, Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary, and a graphing calculator. It has specialized search tools to find millions of hours worth of digital lessons and homework, all aligned to Common Core educational standards that are currently being adopted by most school systems.

You could probably take it along with your 5-year-old kid to a desert island and get her halfway to a college degree.

But that’s not all. Amplify was built from News Corp’s acquisition of Wireless Generation, a major vendor of software-based data systems and assessment tools to schools. So in addition to the content, the new tablets will have lesson-plan builders and dashboard-style tools for teachers, principals, and parents to track and monitor students’ performance.

The 10-inch tablet will be marketed to states, districts, and individual schools for use this coming school year. The cost is $299 a pop for a Wi-Fi-enabled tablet when you buy a two-year subscription to Amplify-branded content, which costs $99 a year. Or you can get one with a 4G data plan for $349 per device and a $179 a year contract. This compares to $399a pop for a non-4G iPad, the most popular tablet in U.S. classrooms. The subscription fees include live chat, phone, and email support and professional development for teachers.

The enthusiasm for touchscreen tablets and phablets in education is surprising even the most ardent technology fans. Apple CEO Tim Cook has said ”the adoption of the iPad in education is something I’ve never seen in any technology.” Education spending on IT is estimated to be at least $20 billion annually, of which a little more than half is currently going to hardware. The Samsung Galaxy, Google Nexus, Kindle, Microsoft Surface, and even the Nook are allvying for market share.

Asked by Fast Company why Amplify wanted to enter this crowded field on the hardware side, Klein cited the power of an integrated hardware and software platform. “My view has been that if we don’t design a product that really facilitates and changes teaching and learning, and all the supports that go together to make this a robust package, then we’ll be where we’ve been [in the past].”

Read the full article here. 

As exciting as this is, one must wonder what happens to the students in schools that can’t afford these tools?